Summer 2017 Courses

AAAS S-20 Introduction to African Languages and Cultures through Social Engagement

CRN 33514 7-week session

This course explores how sub-Saharan Africans use language to understand, organize, and transmit culture, history, and indigenous knowledge to successive generations. Language serves as a road map to comprehending how social, political, and economic institutions and processes develop, from kinship structures and the evolution of political offices to trade relations and the transfer of environmental knowledge. As a social engagement course, we combine scholarly inquiry and academic study with practical experience and personal involvement in the community. Students are given the opportunity to study Africans, their languages, and their cultures from the ground up, not only through textbooks and data sets but through personal relationships, cultural participation, and inquisitive explorations of local African heritage communities. By examining linguistic debates and cultural traditions and interrogating their import in the daily lives of Boston-area Africans, we hope to bridge the divide between grand theories and everyday practices, between intellectual debates and the lived experiences of individuals, between the American academy and the African world. Ultimately, this course aims to bring Africans themselves into the center of the academic study of Africa.

Faculty:

John M. Mugane

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33514/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 211

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

AAAS S-100 Introduction to African American Literature

CRN 33871 7-week session

This course introduces students to a variety of African American prose, narrative, poems, and plays, in order to explore topics such as race, identity, politics, gender, and language. These texts are read in their social and historical context. The ample variety of genres allows students to address questions such as how do different genres help shape narratives of the African-American experience? How do these texts inform and shape our understanding of American history? Part I of the course looks at African American literature produced during slavery, from Phillis Wheatley to Harriet Jacobs. Part II examines the period known as Postbellum, Pre-Harlem, from Paul Laurence Dunbar to W. E. B. Du Bois. Part III looks at the literature produced from the Harlem Renaissance to our days, from Zora Neale Hurston to James McBride.

Faculty:

Giovanna Micconi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33871/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 101

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

AAAS S-172 Narrative and the African Experience

CRN 33125 7-week session

This course is canceled.

ANTH S-1140 Icons: A Material History of Harvard

CRN 32787 7-week session

This course explores how material culture creates and supports the frameworks within which people live. To this end, we investigate the history and perception of Harvard University through material icons: tangible and embodied symbols of the school. From the veritas shield to sweatshirts, printing type to the John Harvard statue, objects, places, people, images, and songs created the institution we know as Harvard while expressing broader historical trends. Topics include gender, power, consumerism, and identity. Video tours, place-based exercises, and online discussions foster experiential learning. While exploring the hidden histories of this iconic university, students gain critical thinking skills and new perspectives on American cultures, histories, and identities.

Faculty:

Christina J. Hodge

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32787/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ANTH S-1170 Prehistory of the World, Part I

CRN 33928 3-week session II

This course is canceled.

ANTH S-1600 Introduction to Social Anthropology

CRN 31819 7-week session

The course explores anthropological approaches to society, culture, history, and current events. Themes include social organization, ideology, religion, exchange, subsistence, gender, land use, ethnicity, ethnic conflict, and local/global interrelations. Students explore these themes through detailed studies of women in North Africa, ethnicity in Bosnia, ritual exchange in the South Pacific, and political organization in Southeast Asia. The instructor also reviews his current applied research on contemporary indigenous responses to political, economic, and ecological changes in Latin America, with special emphasis on the Amazon Basin. Students grapple with the intellectual and ethical challenges, both past and present, of anthropologists.

Faculty:

Theodore Macdonald, Jr.

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31819/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall B1

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections for graduate-credit students, optional sections for undergraduate-credit students to be arranged.

ANTH S-1625 Animal Studies: An Introduction

CRN 33537 7-week session

This course traces the history and shape of academic efforts to study non-human animals. Animal studies scholars explore such questions as, how do contemporary Western societies characterize the differences between humans and non-human animals? What ethical debates surround the use of animals in scientific research or the use of animals for food? How different are other cultures' views of non-human animals from the views that now prevail in the United States and other early twenty-first century industrialized societies? Class sessions are discussion based and students undertake group work, significant writing, and an individual presentation.

Faculty:

Paul F. Waldau

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33537/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ANTH S-1651 The Body in Art and Material Culture

CRN 33896 7-week session

This course uses collections from the Harvard Art Museums and Peabody Museum to consider broad issues in anthropology and critical museology related to the body, as both subject and object, individual and social. Working with museum objects found in Harvard's rich collections of art, anthropology, and archaeology, students actively explore how the body has been conceptualized, contextualized, represented, and materialized across time, space, and culture. The history of museums and collecting, changing exhibit styles, museum ethics, and challenges to traditional museum practices are also explored through readings, discussion, conducting hands-on research in the collections, and critical viewing of exhibitions. The format of the course involves class discussions (informed by required readings) centered on museum collections. Integrated into every session are museum-based visits to the Harvard Art Museums or the Peabody Museum, including exhibition galleries, the art study center/object study classroom, conservation, and other departments, and students have the opportunity to interact with museum staff performing a wide variety of functions.

Faculty:

David Reid Odo

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33896/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Art Museums 0600

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

ANTH S-1662 The Human Market: The Global Traffic in Human Beings

CRN 33520 7-week session

The course introduces students to the wide range of cultural and ethical questions surrounding the trade in humans. We consider issues ranging from the traffic in women and children to the trade in human organs. We especially explore the cultural, racial, class, and gender issues inherent in transactions in human beings and their flesh. Who is selling their organs on the international market and why? Whose babies go to whom in international adoption, and who decides what the best interests of the children are? Whose bones are sold to museums and medical schools, and what do such transactions mean? For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

Keridwen N. Luis

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33520/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Lamont Library 240

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ANTH S-1665 Who Lives, Who Dies: An Introduction to Global Health and Social Medicine

CRN 33864 7-week session

Faculty:

Jason Bryan Silverstein

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33864/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 202

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ANTH S-1725 Anthropology and Film

CRN 32155 7-week session

This course is canceled.

APMA S-115 Mathematical Modeling

CRN 33607 7-week session

Mathematical models are ubiquitous, providing a quantitative framework for understanding, prediction, and decision making in nearly every aspect of life, ranging from the timing of traffic lights, to the control of the spread of disease, to resource management, to sports. They also play a fundamental role in all natural sciences and increasingly in the social sciences as well. This course provides an introduction to modeling through in-depth discussions of a series of examples, and hands-on exercises and projects that make use of a range of continuous and discrete mathematical tools.

Faculty:

Zhiming Kuang

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33607/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Pierce Hall 301

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

MATH S-21a and MATH S-21b or permission of instructor. Knowledge of some programming language is helpful, but not necessary, as we introduce Matlab to those with no previous experience. Students must have laptop computer for class with Matlab installed.

ARAB S-AAB Elementary Arabic

CRN 31732 7-week session

This course introduces students to the phonology and script of classical/modern standard Arabic and covers the basic morphology and syntax of the written language. We emphasize the development of four skills: reading, speaking, listening, and writing. Samples of modern (contemporary) and classical styles of writing are introduced, and audiovisual material from the contemporary Arabic media is included.

Faculty:

Feryal Hijazi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31732/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

January 1, 1970

Class meetings

Mondays-Fridays, 9 am-noon and 1:30-3 pm in Sever Hall, room 306.

ASTR S-8 Space Exploration and Astrobiology: The Search for Life in the Cosmos

CRN 31489 7-week session

This course is an introduction to the cutting-edge methods astronomers and planetary scientists use to explore the solar system and other stellar systems in our galaxy, with the ultimate goal of finding life elsewhere in the cosmos. Topics include the exploration of planets done by telescopes, orbiters, and rovers; origins of life on Earth and current attempts at creating synthetic life in the lab; the discovery of planets around other stars; new observational and theoretical developments about the origin and evolution of stars and their planets. Students are introduced to the astronomical techniques used in current and planned telescopic space missions, and learn how to interpret the data from several ongoing robotic missions, such as the Mars rovers. Even more importantly, students find out about lives as scientists, learn some of the reasons why astronomers choose their career paths, and how astronomers approach and solve specific scientific problems.

Faculty:

Alessandro Massarotti

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31489/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Geological Museum 102

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Required laboratories to be arranged.

High school algebra; some physics background is useful but not necessary.

ASTR S-30 A Short Tour of the Universe Guided by Einstein and Others

CRN 33190 7-week session

This course discusses what we understand of the universe, guided by those who have shaped our understanding. We use as a springboard each week one or more key papers by Einstein, Penrose, Hawking, Guth, and others, and discuss the main ideas in them. All the background information needed to understand these ideas is provided in detail.

Faculty:

Arvind Borde

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33190/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 206

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

High school algebra and trigonometry; some physics background is useful but not necessary.

ASTR S-35 Fundamentals of Contemporary Astronomy: Planets, Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe

CRN 31194 7-week session

The fundamentals of astronomy are covered in the context of contemporary research. We study five areas being actively investigated by astronomers today. Topics include stars, galaxies, and the large-scale structure of the Universe; the history of the Universe; the nature of dark matter and dark energy; and exoplanets. The course is designed to help students explore the frontiers of research in astronomy, and to get a feeling for what it is like to be an astronomer, using the new generation of ground- and space-based telescopes, combined with sophisticated theoretical techniques and computational facilities. As we study each aspect of the Universe, we ask how we came to know what we know today, what the open questions are, and how astronomers are searching for the answers to these questions.

Faculty:

Rosanne Di Stefano

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31194/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard College Observatory Phillips Auditorium, 60 Garden Street

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

High school algebra; some physics background is useful but not necessary.

BIOS S-1B Introduction to Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

CRN 33927 7-week session

This course covers anatomy and physiology, as well as the origin of life and principles of evolution. Laboratory sections scheduled throughout the series allow students to reinforce concepts covered in lecture. BIOS S-1b is part of an introductory biology series (BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b) that fulfills the medical school admission requirement of two semesters of biology.

Faculty:

Cristina L. Walcher-Chevillet

Casey J. Roehrig

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33927/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall C

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required labs Wednesdays, 1-4 pm. Required sections Mondays, time to be arranged.

High school biology, chemistry, and algebra.

BIOS S-1A Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology

CRN 33926 7-week session

The principles of molecular and cellular biology are covered in this course, with a focus on molecular mechanisms, energy and metabolism, and genetics. The emphasis is on cells as evolved systems for the capture and transformation of energy, the processing of molecular information, and the relationship between form and function. Laboratory sections scheduled throughout the series allow students to reinforce concepts covered in lecture. BIOS S-1a is part of an introductory biology series (BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b) that fulfills the medical school admission requirement of two semesters of biology.

Faculty:

Diane Phuong Nghinh Lam

Madhvi J. Venkatesh

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33926/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall C

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required labs Thursdays, 1-4 pm. Required sections to be arranged.

High school mathematics, chemistry, and biology. College-level chemistry is not required but is strongly recommended. Students are assumed to be familiar with atomic structures, types of bonding, electronegativity, pH, redox reactions, and chemical and structural formulas.

BIOS S-10 Introduction to Biochemistry

CRN 32376 7-week session

This course is an integrated introduction to the structure of macromolecules and a biochemical approach to protein function. The organization of macromolecules is addressed through a discussion of their hierarchical structure, and a study of their assembly into complexes responsible for specific biological processes. Topics addressing protein function include enzyme kinetics, the characterization of major metabolic pathways and their interconnection into tightly regulated networks. Current laboratory techniques are discussed during lecture, and examples showing the organization of protein networks and disease-linked protein profiles are drawn from proteomic studies. The laboratory portion of the course exposes students to a broad range of experimental approaches, including affinity purification, enzyme kinetics, analysis of protein folding, and stability. The laboratory exercises are designed to give students a direct experience of research conducted in a modern laboratory.

Faculty:

Alain Viel

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32376/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall E

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required laboratories to be arranged.

BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent.

BIOS S-12 Principles and Techniques of Molecular Biology

CRN 32378 7-week session

The course addresses both the fundamental principles and techniques of molecular biology. Students gain an in-depth knowledge of nucleic acid structure, molecular genetics, and the biochemistry of transcription and protein synthesis. Other topics include how mechanisms of gene regulation play a role in retroviral pathogenesis, embryonic development, and the generation of immune diversity. Each lecture directly relates molecular biology to current laboratory techniques. The laboratory portion of the course represents a complete experimental project. A combination of experiments gives students a broad exposure to several important techniques in molecular biology, together with the direct experience of an intensive research project. Experiments include current approaches to mutation analysis, protein interaction assays, and recombinant cDNA cloning by PCR.

Faculty:

Alain Viel

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32378/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall E

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required laboratories to be arranged.

BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent.

BIOS S-14 Principles of Genetics

CRN 32374 7-week session

This course focuses on transmission and molecular genetics. Topics include chromosome structure and replication, genetic linkage and mapping, regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, epigenetics, genetic mutation, genetics of cancer, and the principles of genetic engineering. The course makes use of bioinformatics to explore gene function, and pertinent applications of bioinformatics and genetics to modern biological problems are discussed.

Faculty:

Steven Theroux

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32374/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall E

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3-4 pm.

BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent.

BIOS S-50 Neurobiology

CRN 32375 7-week session

This course is an introduction to the organization and function of the nervous system. Topics to be covered include cell biology of neurons, neurotransmitters, electrical signaling, sensory and motor systems, developmental neurobiology, simple circuits, learning, and behavior. We also discuss the molecular basis of neurodegenerative disease and mental illness.

Faculty:

Ryan W. Draft

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32375/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall C

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

Introductory biology course or permission of instructor.

BIOS S-74 Marine Life and Ecosystems of the Sea

CRN 32373 7-week session

This course explores the life history and adaptations of marine life and the ecosystems of the sea. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fragility and resilience of marine systems in the face of anthropogenically driven perturbations such as habitat fragmentation, elevated sea surface temperature, alien species, nonsustainable fishing practices, and increased global tourism.

Faculty:

Collin H. Johnson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32373/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Museum of Comparative Zoology 202

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm.

One year of secondary school biology.

BIOS S-129 Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

CRN 33786 7-week session

We are entering a new era in which a fundamental understanding of developmental biology and regeneration will play a critical role. In this course, embryonic and adult stem cells in different organisms are examined in terms of their molecular, cellular, and potential therapeutic properties. Genetic reprogramming and cloning of animals are critically evaluated. Ethical and political considerations are also considered. For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

William J. Anderson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33786/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Robinson Hall 105

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent.

BIOS S-129 Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

CRN 32639 7-week session

We are entering a new era in which a fundamental understanding of developmental biology and regeneration will play a critical role. In this course, embryonic and adult stem cells in different organisms are examined in terms of their molecular, cellular, and potential therapeutic properties. Genetic reprogramming and cloning of animals are critically evaluated. Ethical and political considerations are also considered.

Faculty:

William J. Anderson

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32639/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall A

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections Tuesdays, 5:30-6:30 pm.

BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent.

BIOS S-150 The Biology of Cancer

CRN 33128 7-week session

This course explores the biology of cancer. We start by examining the personal, social, and economic consequences of this disease. We then focus on the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. We study the nature of cancer, the role of viruses in cancer, cellular oncogenes, cellular signaling mechanisms, tumor suppressor genes, and the maintenance of genomic integrity. We also examine the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, cellular immortalization, tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Finally, we examine how modern molecular medicine is being used to treat cancer.

Faculty:

Steven Theroux

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33128/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall E

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections Mondays, Wednesdays, 3-4 pm.

BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, or the equivalent, plus an additional college-level biology course.

BIOS S-175 Optical Imaging in Biology

CRN 32731 7-week session

From the basic microscopes used by Robert Hooke when he coined the phrase "cell" to Rosalind Franklin's X-ray diffraction images used to explain the DNA double helix structure, imaging technologies have enabled scientists to make amazing biological discoveries. This course explores the historical development of various modern optical imaging techniques, their underlying mechanisms based in physics, their applications in biomedical research, and the advantages and limitations of each technique. Students learn to apply various forms of optical imaging to different biological samples and use computer-based image analysis software to extract relevant information from images.

Faculty:

Lai Ding

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32731/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 208

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections meeting in the Longwood Medical Area to be arranged.

High school math and sciences (physics, trigonometry, geometry, biology, and chemistry); good computer skills.

BIOS S-200 Proseminar: Graduate Research Methods and Scholarly Writing in the Biological Sciences

CRN 32752 7-week session

This proseminar is designed to teach students many of the writing and analytical skills that are required to succeed in graduate-level courses in the biological sciences. Through critical reading and presentation of research articles, students learn how to form questions that can be addressed experimentally and how to write a corresponding, testable hypothesis. The course also addresses the process of experimental design and current experimental methodologies in biology. Students are given multiple opportunities to hone their writing skills on several short writing assignments. Students are expected to participate in class discussions, present a paper to the class, and write a final research proposal due at the end of the semester. We focus our attention on the molecular mechanisms of innate immune responses to pathogens. Some prior knowledge of immunology is beneficial but not required. Students learn to think scientifically while they gain knowledge of basic mechanisms of immune protection against bacterial pathogens.

Faculty:

Mihaela G. Gadjeva

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32752/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 104

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course; molecular biology (BIOS S-12 or the equivalent) highly recommended.

BIOT S-150 Medical Genomics and Genetics

CRN 33104 3-week session II

Faculty:

Yitzhak Pilpel

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33104/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 208

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

BIOS S-14 or the equivalent.

BIOT S-200 Proseminar: Graduate Research Methods and Scholarly Writing in Biotechnology

CRN 32666 7-week session

In this proseminar, we focus on science writing, data interpretation, and collaborative and independent experimental design. Students who successfully complete the course are those who demonstrate an ability to assess information from the primary scientific literature, a command of oral and written communication skills, and the ability to generate a logical progression of experiments to help validate or nullify their hypothesis. Reading materials include publications on scientific writing and experimental design.

Faculty:

Elizabeth Wiltrout

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32666/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B109

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

The instructor assumes that students already have undergraduate degrees in an area of life, physical, or computer science, as well as professional scientific training. Scientists coming from a physical or computer science background should successfully complete BIOS S-1a and BIOS S-1b, and BIOS S-12, or their equivalents, before attempting to take BIOT S-200. Students must earn a satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

CELT S-110 Introduction to Irish Myth, Folklore, and Music

CRN 31418 7-week session

Ireland from its earliest times to the present boasts a rich and complex mythic tradition that serves as an energizing source for literature, folk- and fairy-lore, and even music. Students consider medieval and more recent sources for mythological study, and examine such topics as Ireland's sacred geography, deities, fairies, heroes, folk ritual, and traditional songs and tunes.

Faculty:

Kathryn Ann Chadbourne

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31418/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Lamont Library 230

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

CELT S-132 An Introduction to Modern Irish Language and Film

CRN 33909 7-week session

Students learn to speak Modern Irish (Gaelic) on a beginners level, while exploring aspects of Irish culture through Irish language films. Classes include structured lessons on basic Irish grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Oral and listening skills are reinforced by short conversations and recordings of Irish verse and song. A selection of Irish language films (with English subtitles) is viewed in class, with attention to language and cultural issues.

Faculty:

Margo Griffin-Wilson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33909/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 110

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

CHEM S-A Chemistry in Context

CRN 33634 7-week session

This course is an integrated introduction to general chemistry, taught in a contextual framework of social, environmental, technological, and health issues. It is intended for students with little to no background in chemistry, as well as those who desire to expand their understanding of chemistry. The topics covered include atomic structures and properties, stoichiometry, solutions, chemical bonding, energy, thermochemistry, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry, polymers, chemical equilibrium, basic acids and bases, and drug design.

Faculty:

Sirinya Matchacheep

Lu Wang

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33634/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall E

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Two one-and-a-half-hour discussion sections and one required two-and-a-half-hour laboratories per week to be arranged.

No prior background in chemistry is required. Basic knowledge of algebra can be helpful.

CHEM S-1AB General Chemistry

CRN 30877 7-week session

This is a comprehensive survey of chemistry for the general student that emphasizes the principles underlying the formation and interaction of chemical substances: stoichiometry, states of matter, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, intermolecular forces, solutions, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and environmental chemistry. This course fulfills the requirement of two semesters of inorganic chemistry for entrance to medical school.

Faculty:

Gregg Tucci

Justin McCarty

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30877/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall D

Mondays-Fridays, 9:30-11:50 am

Three required two-hour laboratories, three one-hour discussion sections, and one two-and-a-half-hour review sessions per week to be arranged.

High school algebra and chemistry.

CHEM S-17 Principles of Organic Chemistry

CRN 33668 7-week session

This course is a one-semester (4-credit) introduction to organic chemistry, with an emphasis on structure and bonding, reaction mechanisms, and chemical reactivity. It covers all of the important functional groups and reactivity needed for applications in medicine and biochemistry, including aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, and amides. Students who succeed in in this course are well prepared for the organic chemistry portion of medical school entrance exams and other similar exams. Students who need a full year of organic chemistry (8 credits) should take CHEM S-20ab, which goes into greater depth with extensive coverage of laboratory organic synthesis, spectroscopy, and other topics needed for more advanced study of the subject.

Faculty:

Logan S. McCarty

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33668/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 21, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 302

Wednesdays, Fridays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required laboratory sections meet roughly twice per week for 5 hours each, either 1-6 pm or 6-11 pm. Optional discussion sections to be announced.

One year of general chemistry (equivalent to CHEM S-1ab) with a grade of C or better, or equivalent preparation (for example, an AP Chemistry course).

CHEM S-20AB Organic Chemistry

CRN 30609 7-week session

This course is an intensive, comprehensive introduction to the chemistry of carbon and its importance to biological molecules. Topics include current ideas of bonding and structure, major reaction mechanisms and pathways, a discussion of the analytical tools used to determine the structure and stereochemistry of organic compounds (such as infrared and NMR spectroscopy), and some of the chemistry of amino acids, peptides, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. This course fulfills the requirement of two semesters of organic chemistry for entrance to medical school.

Faculty:

Austin B. Scharf

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30609/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $

Start date

January 1, 1970

Class meetings

Mondays, Tuesdays, 8:30-11:30 am; and Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 8:30-10:45 am in Science Center, Hall B. Required sections meet every day: Mondays, Tuesdays, 11:30 am-1 pm or 1-2:30 pm; Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 10:45 am-12:30 pm or 1-2:45 pm. One laboratory section 1-6 pm and one laboratory section 6-11 pm on different days (except Fridays). Required weekly review sessions Fridays, 3-5 pm.

CHEM S-101 Experimental Chemistry

CRN 33045 7-week session

This course is canceled.

CHEM S-105 Polymer Chemistry

CRN 33899 7-week session

This course is canceled.

CHIN S-BA Elementary Modern Chinese I

CRN 32809 7-week session

This is a beginning course in modern standard Chinese (Mandarin) designed for students who have very little or no background in the language. Its goal is to lay a good foundation for Chinese for further study, and to strive for an all-round development of communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing in modern Chinese. It provides basic training of pronunciation and tones, syntactic structures and usage, commonly used vocabulary for day-to-day life, and character recognition and writing. Lectures focus on grammar and vocabulary. In drill class, students practice using grammar and vocabulary with an emphasis on accuracy and fluency. Students reach the beginning level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) scale, and are ready for the second semester of first-year Chinese by the end of this course.

Faculty:

Haibo Hu

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32809/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B106

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

CHIN S-BAB Elementary Modern Chinese I, II

CRN 32810 7-week session

This course is an introduction to basic Chinese grammar, vocabulary, usage, and the writing system for students with little or no background in the language. It is the first-year level Chinese taught at Harvard. The course is designed to help students acquire the rudimentary knowledge of Chinese and develop basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in the language. Students should be able to talk about most of the following at the end of the course: general topics such as classroom objects, colors, clothing, time, weather, seasons, family members, self-identification, greetings, and denomination of money; everyday survival topics such as personal information, restaurant ordering and foods, asking or giving directions, hobbies and activities, transportation, talking on the phone, lodging or living quarters, money matters, health matters, and shopping or making purchases; and matters of courtesy such as greetings and introductions, making appointments, making meeting arrangements, accepting or refusing invitations, and polite formal expressions.

Faculty:

Jie Ying

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32810/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 303

Mondays-Fridays, 8:30 am-12:30 pm

COMP S-109 Reality, Desire, and the Epic Form: Homer, Dante, and Joyce

CRN 33322 7-week session

The relation of desire and reality has been a constant topic in literature. The most comprehensive and influential treatments of that relation have come in the epic, which presents the real and the longed for as the poles organizing civilization and individual experience. This course is a close reading of Homer's Odyssey, Dante's Commedia, and Joyce's Ulysses, to see how the epic presentation of human love and knowledge, especially metaphoric depiction of these as journeys, has changed and stayed the same from the ancient to the modern world.

Faculty:

Theoharis C. Theoharis

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33322/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 106

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

COMP S-116 Big Ideas, Great Thinkers

CRN 33321 7-week session

Great thinkers have existed around the world and across time. Their ideas have been an integral part of social, economic, cultural, and political life. Their philosophical and literary contribution has not simply been the isolated speculation of a few remarkable individuals but has extended much further: they have shaped their communities historically and continue to form our contemporary global society and culture. This course takes a cross-cultural historical look at some of the most influential philosophical and literary traditions such as the ancient Greek, Chinese, Indian, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, and Mayan. In each tradition the course examines various original writings on the following questions: how should we organize our social, economic, cultural, and political life? What is the place of humans in the grand, cosmological scheme of things? And how should one live one's life? Some of the writings we review include those of Plato, Aristotle, Herodotus, Confucius, Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Sun Tzu, the Brahmanical tradition, the Buddha, as well as the "The Epic of Gilgamesh" and "The Popol Vuh."

Faculty:

Thomas Ponniah

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33321/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S050

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

CREA S-22 Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

CRN 33528 3-week session II

This course is designed for students who want to explore nonfiction writing. Exploring a wide variety of forms and voices, students analyze the elements of strong nonfiction writing, and produce two works of nonfiction through the class: a personal essay and a reported piece of creative nonfiction. Essays are workshopped in class.

Faculty:

Deirdre Alanna Mask

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33528/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 218

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

CREA S-25 Beginning Fiction

CRN 33954 7-week session

Faculty:

Mary Sullivan Walsh

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33954/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Robinson Hall 106

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

CREA S-25 Beginning Fiction

CRN 32442 7-week session

Faculty:

Christopher S. Mooney

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32442/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

CREA S-45B Playwriting

CRN 33113 7-week session

This course is canceled.

CREA S-45A Beginning Screenwriting

CRN 32078 7-week session

This is a workshop for those who wish to learn the foundations and processes for writing feature-length motion picture screenplays. Topics include concept and theme development, dramatic structure, plot, character arc, dialogue writing, the use of visual language, and writing in format. By the semester's end, students produce a full feature film treatment and complete Act 1 of their film in script format. Meetings consist of discussions of work presented, writing exercises, brief lectures, film clip and script analyses, and table readings of scripts.

Faculty:

Susan Steinberg

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32078/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 302

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

CREA S-100R Advanced Fiction Writing: The Short Story

CRN 33639 7-week session

This is an intensive workshop in the craft of writing short fiction for students who have read widely among past and contemporary masters of short fiction and who are accomplished in the elements of prose composition (mechanics, syntax, and structure). Students are expected to produce two new short stories (10 to 20 pages each) and to revise them during the term.

Faculty:

Lindsay Mitchell

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33639/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building K107

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

CREA S-105R Advanced Fiction: Writing the Novel

CRN 33929 3-week session I

Writing a novel can be daunting for even the most experienced writers. How does a writer create characters that readers care about? What makes readers want to keep reading? In workshop format, writers engage with one another's work as well as with contemporary fiction to gain a deeper understanding of what makes a novel compelling.

Faculty:

Vanessa Diffenbaugh

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33929/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 205

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A novel should be underway before the course begins. Interested students should register for the course, and submit 15 pages of a novel-in-progress to Vanessa Diffenbaugh at vanessadiffenbaugh@gmail.com by May 15. Admission is based on this submission. Students not admitted are notified by the Registrar's Office and dropped from the class by June 1. If they don't choose a replacement course and are in no other Summer School courses, are issued a full refund of their Summer School tuition and fees; travel expenses cannot be refunded. After May 15, students registering late should submit their sample as soon as possible after registering.

CREA S-110R Advanced Poetry Writing

CRN 33516 7-week session

Faculty:

Stephanie Burt

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33516/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 218

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

At least one creative-writing workshop or at least one course in the study of poetry or permission of the instructor.

CREA S-120R Advanced Screenplay Writing: From Page to Screen

CRN 33515 7-week session

Writing the screenplay for the next box office smash or successful independent film requires inspiration; it also requires knowledge of the screenwriter's craft. This course provides both. Students learn screenwriting techniques with a particular focus on literary adaptation. The course closely examines a range of award-winning short films and students write their own film scripts inspired by a short story, or a newspaper or magazine article. By the end of the course, students have a better understanding of the relationships between structure, scene, and dialogue, and they are better equipped to write compelling screenplays. Experience in prose, fiction, or screenwriting is helpful but not required.

Faculty:

Jan Schuette

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33515/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 416

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Students must come to the first class with an idea for a feature length screenplay that they would like to write.

CREA S-124 Writing for TV

CRN 33878 7-week session

Faculty:

Bryan Delaney

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33878/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Ideally, students should come to the class with an idea for a TV series that they'd like to write (drama or comedy). This is not mandatory, though, as we explore how to generate these ideas in the first class.

CREA S-175 Legal Writing

CRN 30140 7-week session

This course is designed for law students, students considering law school, or writers who wish to improve their analytical writing. It is based on the assumption that good legal writing communicates well-considered ideas clearly, concisely, and accurately. Students use the elements of good writing to construct legal arguments, to argue from precedent and principle, and to use facts effectively. They draft a variety of basic legal documents that may include a case brief, a complaint, an answer, an opinion letter, a legal memorandum, and a statute. Course materials may be based on contemporary social issues drawing on the areas of constitutional due process, criminal law, domestic relations law, and the right to privacy.

Faculty:

Rosemary Daly

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30140/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 111

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

CSCI S-1 Great Ideas in Computer Science with Java

CRN 33196 7-week session

This course is an introduction to the most important discoveries and intellectual paradigms in computer science, designed for students with little or no previous background. We explore problem-solving methods and algorithm development using the high-level programming languages Java and Scratch. Students learn how to design, code, debug, and document programs using techniques of good programming style in a Linux-based environment. This course presents an integrated view of computer systems, from hardware architecture and data communication systems through compilers and cryptography. We examine theoretical and practical limitations related to unsolvable and intractable computational problems, and the social and ethical dilemmas presented by such issues as software unreliability and invasion of privacy. Students may count only one of CSCI S-1, CSCI E-10a, CSCI E-50a, or CSCI E-50 for degree credit.

Faculty:

Henry H. Leitner

Dimitri Kountourogianni

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33196/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G115

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

CSCI S-3 Introduction to Web Programming Using JavaScript

CRN 33923 7-week session

This course provides an introduction to web development by way of the essential language and runtime environment that powers modern web interfaces. Through a series of examples and projects, students learn basic programming concepts while building an understanding of the power and complexities of Javascript, which can perplex even experienced web developers. The course provides a solid foundation in computer programming in Javascript: syntax and data structures, conditionals, objects, scope and closures, AJAX, the DOM, and event handling. Students gain an understanding of the popular libraries that power rich web applications such as jQuery, Ext JS, and others. Upon completion, students are prepared to use Javascript libraries in their projects, write their own or extend existing JavaScript libraries, and build rich web applications using these powerful tools. No computer programming experience is required, though exposure to basic HTML and CSS is helpful.

Faculty:

Laurence P. Bouthillier

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33923/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

CSCI S-7 Introduction to Programming with Python

CRN 33562 3-week session II

Python is a language with a simple syntax, and a powerful set of libraries. It is an interpreted language, with a rich programming environment, including a robust debugger and profiler. While it is easy for beginners to learn, it is widely used in many scientific areas for data exploration. This course is an introduction to the Python programming language for students without prior programming experience. We cover data types, control flow, and introduce the analysis of program performance. The examples and problems used in this course are drawn from diverse areas such as text processing and simple graphics creation. Students implement a final project of their own design.

Faculty:

Jeff Parker

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33562/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 104

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Comfort with computers, text editors, and the command line.

CSCI S-12 Fundamentals of Website Development

CRN 33291 7-week session

This course provides a comprehensive overview of website development. Students explore the prevailing vocabulary, tools, and standards used in the field and learn how the various facets including HTML5, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ajax, multimedia, scripting languages, HTTP, clients, servers, and databases function together in today's web environment. The course provides a solid web development foundation, focusing on content and client-side (browser) components (HTML5, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, multimedia), with an overview of the server-side technologies. In addition, software and services that are easily incorporated into a website (for example, maps, checkout, blogs, content management) are surveyed and discussed. Students produce an interactive website on the topic of their choice for the final project and leave the course prepared for more advanced and focused web development studies. Students should plan on bringing a laptop to class for in-class exercises and work.

Faculty:

David P. Heitmeyer

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33291/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 202

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Introductory coursework in computer science, CSCI S-1, or the equivalent.

CSCI S-38 Introduction to C++ for Programmers

CRN 33956 7-week session

Faculty:

Lisa DiOrio

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33956/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street L01

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

A working knowledge of a structured programming language such as C, Java, Javascript, or Python.

CSCI S-40 Communication Protocols and Internet Architectures

CRN 33106 7-week session

This course provides a structured technical approach to the design, analysis, and implementation of Internet protocols and network architectures. We study various protocols, including TCP/IP, WWW/HTTP, LAN protocols, and client/server protocols. The course also discusses new areas of work, including voice and video over the Internet, network QoS, and high bandwidth wireless networks. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course CSCI E-40.

Faculty:

Leonard Evenchik

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33106/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Required sections on Tuesdays, 7:30-9:30 pm, which students may attend in person, watch and participate in via live video streaming, or watch at their convenience after the meeting each week.

Some programming and Internet experience.

CSCI S-41 Secure Software Development

CRN 33898 7-week session

This course explores the implementation of security controls within web applications, mobile applications, utility applications, and traditional applications. Students explore secure coding techniques as well as application security configuration techniques. Specific review of secure coding techniques includes data validation, session management, exception handling, and data encryption. Specific review of application security configuration techniques includes the secure configuration management of the application web server, middleware, and database. Students also review policy-specific requirements necessary to implement a secure development program within enterprise organizations. Specifically, students use source code analysis tools, HTTP proxies, automated scanners, and command-line tools to appraise software security.

Faculty:

Jenelle Davis

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33898/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Basic working knowledge of at least one high-level programming language.

CSCI S-65G Introduction to Mobile Application Development Using Swift and iOS

CRN 33540 7-week session

This course introduces the basics of contemporary mobile application development using Apple's iOS technology as the development platform. The main requirement of the course is to build a functioning application in iOS. Each week of class covers a different aspect of development which is used in the final project. We begin with a discussion of UI layout, constraints and programming for devices of various sizes and aspect ratios, making extensive use of Apple's Interface Builder technology. Next we discuss the major features of the Swift programming language and its standard library, along with basic use of the Xcode IDE for Swift development. Basic language features are covered lightly so that extensive discussion may be focused on differentiating features of the language including closures, optionals, the Swift type system (tuple/enum/struct/class/func), and generics. Special attention is paid to functional programming concepts such as map/reduce. Then we extend the programming model to incorporate the Cocoa Touch framework (for both the iPhone and iPad). Specific Cocoa Touch features include Apple's model/view/controller paradigm and supporting classes, event handling, Core Graphics, and the UIKit. Frequent small assignments progress from basic programming to realistic app development with a focus on responsive device graphics and algorithms. Code design and architecture are emphasized.

Faculty:

Ronald V. Simmons

John P. LaFond

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33540/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 306

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

While this is an introduction to mobile development, it is not an introductory programming course. Students must have a knowledge of at least one object-oriented programming language such as Java or C++, and also have a semester course in data structures. Students must have a firm understanding of how to compile code, use libraries, use the debugger, and use a source control tool such as GIT. This is a class about iOS, so the student must have a Macintosh laptop running a current version of the operating system. Students with deeper experience in commercial or academic settings may well be better served by considering CSCI S-65.

CSCI S-65 Advanced Mobile Application Development Using Swift and iOS

CRN 33310 7-week session

This course intends to transition basic familiarity with Xcode and the Swift (v. 3) language into a viable workforce skill, while keeping an eye on concepts that apply to all mobile programming environments and user interface (UI) programming generally. We cover the essential UI frameworks to implement real-world applications: interactive controls, navigation among views, formatted text, 2D custom drawing, and table views and collection views. Critical concepts and frameworks to support the UI include constraint-based visual layout (Auto Layout), asynchronous programming for I/O bound tasks, REST/JSON/XML data exchange, interprocess notifications, and the protocol/delegate pattern. Advanced frameworks include, as time allows, audio-visual (camera, song playback, speech synthesis, image processing) and physical sensors (gyroscope, accelerometer, GPS, bluetooth) that give iOS devices environmental awareness and rich input/output capabilities. We review and expand on supporting essentials: packaging for the App Store, Xcode fluency, interactive debugging, clean separation into MVC components, and language features such as type interference, closure blocks, computed properties, and the Foundation library.

Faculty:

Daniel E. Bromberg

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33310/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 302

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

Ability to build a basic, interactive app in Xcode, in Objective-C, or Swift (online self tutorials are acceptable). At least three semesters, or one year professional experience, in a strongly typed, object-oriented programming language. Solid grounding in data structures (such as hash tables and linked lists). A portable Mac and iOS device, each running the latest OS. Students with no professional programming experience and fewer than three semesters of college-level computer science coursework may well be better served by considering CSCI S-65g.

CSCI S-71 Agile Software Development

CRN 33524 3-week session I

This course is an immersive experience in Agile software development. We study both the technical and cultural/social aspects of Agile, including pair and mob programming, high-performance teams with the core protocols, test-driven development, behavior-driven development, continuous delivery, clean code, refactoring, extreme programming, Scrum, Kanban, and Agile project management.Students must have and bring to class a laptop computer suitable for software development.

Faculty:

Richard Kasperowski

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33524/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 203

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

The Harvard Extension School course CSCI E-22.

CSCI S-73 Developing Cross-Platform Mobile Apps With Xamarin

CRN 33932 3-week session II

Mobile devices are the hottest sector in software development today, but covering all the available platforms is tricky. Xamarin forms provides a framework for covering all major mobile platforms from a single C# codebase. We start with the basic anatomy of a Xamarin mobile app. We examine the design choices between portable class libraries and shared asset projects, and between using XAML and code for constructing objects and setting their properties. We examine forms and layout, controls, navigation, and text handling. We study styles and user experience design. We conclude with an examination of databinding and model-view-viewmodel architecture stack. This is an applied class, not a theoretical one, and extensive programming homework is required.

Faculty:

David S. Platt

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33932/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 201

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Familiarity with either the C# or Java language. Successful completion of Harvard Extension School course CSCI E-50 or equivalent, or at least one year of industrial experience in object-oriented programming.

CSCI S-78 Wearable Technologies and the Internet of Things

CRN 33578 7-week session

The wearable technologies field has been experiencing explosive growth with exciting applications in the fields of medicine, sports, fitness, entertainment, as well as new ways for people to interact, communicate, and experience the environment around them. The Internet of Things (IoT) works with sensors and software in wearable technologies to provide a communications network that allows data collection and information exchange for wearable devices. The applications range from helping manage chronic diseases to experiencing entertainment, sports, and games in a virtual-reality setting. Enterprise architecture is expanding to include the communications network of the Internet of Things, and data from wearable devices is being incorporated in big data analytics frameworks. In this course we review aspects of wearable technologies, including the software, architecture, UX design, communication networks, and data analytics. We review current and proposed uses of this emerging technology. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course CSCI E-78.

Faculty:

Aline Yurik

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33578/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

CSCI S-111 Intensive Introduction to Computer Science Using Java

CRN 32344 7-week session

This course is a fast-paced introduction to computer science designed for students who plan to work extensively with computers (for example, engineers, biologists, physicists, and economists), as well as future concentrators who plan to take more advanced courses in the field. The course introduces the process of developing algorithms to solve problems, and the corresponding process of designing computer programs to express those algorithms. The first half of the course covers foundational programming concepts such as data types, conditional execution, iteration, and recursion. It also explores the key features of object-oriented programming, and the manipulation of data stored in files and arrays. The second half of the course provides a survey of fundamental data structures for information processing, including lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. It explores the implementation of these data structures using both array-based and linked representations, and it examines classic algorithms that use these structures for tasks such as sorting, searching, and text compression. Techniques for analyzing the efficiency of algorithms are also covered. Problem sets require a minimum of twenty hours of work each week, including both written problems and programming exercises using the Java programming language. Graduate-credit students are expected to complete additional work. The course provides complete coverage of the syllabus for the advanced placement examination in computer science.

Faculty:

David G. Sullivan

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32344/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 113

Mondays-Fridays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.

Familiarity with precalculus. Students who have completed the Harvard Extension School courses CSCI E-10a, CSCI E-10b, CSCI E-22, or CSCI E-50, (CSCI-50a and CSCI E-50b) cannot earn degree credit for CSCI S-111.

DGMD S-30 Video Field Production

CRN 33105 3-week session I

Faculty:

Nicholas J. Manley

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33105/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 202

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

DGMD S-35 Video Editing and Digital Design

CRN 33286 7-week session

This course serves as an introduction to the art of video post-production. We explore the theory and practice of various editing styles in order to gain a better understanding of how stories are constructed in the editing room. Through demonstrations and hands-on experience, students learn advanced editing techniques with an in-depth examination of Adobe Premiere. To further enhance projects, students create animated motion graphics using After Effects. Post-production techniques that improve the sound and image quality of the videos are emphasized. Footage is provided for all exercises and projects. However, students are given the option to shoot new material for their final projects if desired.

Faculty:

Allyson Sherlock

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33286/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 104

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Experience with Macintosh computers.

DGMD S-43 Documentary Film from <em>The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl</em> to <em>Waltz with Bashir</em>

CRN 33900 3-week session I

This course is canceled.

DGMD S-71 Character Design for Animation and Games

CRN 33579 7-week session

The design of a character connects us to the story. So much of the meaning and expressive capability of a character depends on choices of proportion, color, silhouette, and rendering style. This course explores principles of character design and development pipelines for creating expressive animation-ready characters in multiple styles. Students gain an understanding of how to design characters for animation and develop tools for solving visual problems, create a portfolio of character art in diverse styles, and take their strongest designs from 2D to 3D digital models

Faculty:

Jason Wiser

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33579/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Students are expected to bring to class every week a laptop and drawing tablet (small Wacom Intuos recommended) with 2D painting software (Photoshop), and 3D software (Autodesk Maya and Mudbox), all of which are taught in this course.

DGMD S-72 Graphic Storytelling: Comic Book Art and Narrative

CRN 33781 7-week session

Comic books and graphic novels are exceptionally powerful means of communication. From personal memoir to superhero stories to the safety instructions on an airplane, graphic storytelling has the ability to reach across language, age, and societal barriers. This is a digital and analogue art and writing course which examines the structure of the comic book page and the wild storytelling possibilities in the organization of panels, line, shadow, and color. Upon successful completion of this course students gain an understanding of how to design a visual page for graphic clarity and narrative impact. Students develop tools for solving visual problems, and create a portfolio of drawn comic stories. The course is delivered in the form of studio projects, individual and class critiques, lectures, discussions, workshops, and readings.

Faculty:

Jason Wiser

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33781/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 202

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Students are expected to bring to class every week a laptop and drawing tablet (small Wacom Intuos recommended) including 2D painting software (Photoshop), all of which will be taught in this course.

DRAM S-10 Introduction to Acting

CRN 30038 7-week session

This course concentrates on the development of imagination, observation, focus of attention, and the effective use of materials drawn from life. Students work on acting scenes, which include an approach to textual analysis, as well as practice in communication, personal involvements, and the accomplishment of stage tasks. Class work includes extensive individual coaching and ensemble work.

Faculty:

Thomas Derrah

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30038/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Farkas Hall 203

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

DRAM S-11 Acting Workshop: Developing a Character

CRN 30039 7-week session

This course helps students develop a dramatic character through a range of physical and vocal exercises and scene work from plays by Anton Chekhov, Tennessee Williams, and Kaufman and Hart. Students learn to develop their characters' gestures, language, and voice through external and internal influences. Theatricality and characterization are examined through text, exercises, and film.

Faculty:

Ryan Scott McKittrick

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30039/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Loeb Drama Center Dance Studio

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

DRAM S-13 Acting Workshop: Comedy

CRN 31517 7-week session

This course is canceled.

DRAM S-21 Improvisational Acting

CRN 32212 7-week session

This course is designed not only for students of the theater, but also for those with an interest in politics and debate, public speaking, trial law, and education, as well as a broad range of other careers. Students explore various improvisational techniques that fuse intellect, humor, imagination, voice, and body.

Faculty:

Thomas Derrah

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32212/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Farkas Hall Studio

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

DRAM S-22 Directing

CRN 30043 7-week session

This course is for directors interested in theater, TV, and film. The bulk of the work uses live actors working on theater and film scripts. Scenes are rehearsed outside of class and then presented in the classroom. While the majority of scenes are presented live in class, students are welcome to shoot and edit video scenes outside of class and bring in the video work as their scene work for class. (Equipment is not provided; students must use their own video cameras, laptops, and software.) The class focuses on design, working with sound, working with actors, finding the strongest ways to tell a story on stage and with film. The class accommodates all levels, from students with no experience to people interested in pursuing directing professionally. For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

Marcus Stern

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30043/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Farkas Hall Studio

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

DRAM S-24 Performing Musical Theater

CRN 31956 7-week session

In this course we explore how to create a polished and convincing song performance. Each class meeting begins with a group warmup, reviewing the basics of good singing technique and ear training, incorporating improvisational games to help free the voice and body from tensions. Through individual work, we approach each song from both a musical and a dramatic standpoint, discussing character, story, and presentation. Students delve deeply into the song texts, working them as monologues. Group exercises are used to help create character and spontaneity, and students are sometimes asked to participate in classmates' songs to help them create a believable scene. We also learn a group number, incorporating harmony singing and learning how to stage an ensemble piece. The final consists of a polished presentation of each student's song, using all the elements explored throughout the term.

Faculty:

Pamela J. Murray

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31956/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Music Building PH9

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Willingness to sing in front of the class.

DRAM S-140 Public Speaking

CRN 33708 7-week session

This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience's interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Faculty:

Remo Airaldi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33708/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Holden Chapel CHAPEL

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

DRAM S-140 Public Speaking

CRN 32763 7-week session

This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience's interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Faculty:

Remo Airaldi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32763/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Farkas Hall Studio

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

DRAM S-140 Public Speaking

CRN 32727 7-week session

This course aims to introduce students to a practical, hands-on approach to effective public speaking. Our focus is on developing a personal style of speaking that is confident, spontaneous, energetic and vocally and physically expressive. Through exercises, speech presentations, and individual coaching, students learn how to present and develop a persuasive argument while maintaining an audience's interest. The course is aimed at anyone who would like to improve their ability to speak in front of small or large groups, regardless of experience.

Faculty:

Remo Airaldi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32727/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Farkas Hall Studio

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

DRAM S-145 Vocal Production

CRN 33863 7-week session

A practical, experiential, and studio based course designed for students who wish to explore voice, speech, and text analysis for theater, film, TV, or public speaking. Actors, business professionals, singers, or anyone desiring greater mastery of the voice will benefit from the course (see English Proficiency Requirement). Emphasis is placed on helping each speaker find his or her own voice; developing personal specificity, precision and storytelling ability, not cultivating a specific sound. Students who speak English as a second language, or have speech delays or difficulties, are more than welcome and encouraged to take the course. Students develop a deeper awareness of their physical and vocal habits, and learn how to healthfully and sustainably use their voice. They also cultivate strength and precision in their speech, as well as learn tools to create variety and dynamics when speaking. Lastly, they hone their vocal production and communication skills through analysis and performance of text. The course begins with body awareness and the physical sensation of the voice, using exercises drawn from Yoga, Laban movement, the Alexander technique and Fitzmaurice voicework. Students are then asked to explore and utilize breath and vocal support as an action, using both Bel Canto exercises and Fitzmaurice voicework, leading to greater control of the voice and enhanced storytelling ability through the use of pitch, rate, and volume. Finally, using the teachings of Cicely Berry, Fitzmaurice voicework and Knight Thompson speechwork, students use their skills to analyze and perform four texts of their choosing. Class activities include solo and partner exercises to enhance awareness of the body and muscles used for voice and speech. Prior singing, acting, or speech experience are not required.

Faculty:

Ashleigh Reade

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33863/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Farkas Hall 203

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

ECON S-10A Principles of Economics: Microeconomics

CRN 30056 7-week session

This course offers an introduction to the market system, emphasizing economic interactions among individuals, business firms, and government. Topics include supply and demand, economic decision making, social efficiency, perfect and imperfect competition, labor markets, capital markets, and market failures. Issues such as the environment, taxation, and income distribution are addressed. This course is equivalent to the first half of ECON S-10ab.

Faculty:

Hossein S. Kazemi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30056/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 201

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections Mondays, Wednesdays, 1-2 pm, 6:30-7:30 pm, or 7:30-8:30 pm; or Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2-3pm, or 3-4 pm.

Elementary algebra and geometry.

ECON S-10B Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics

CRN 30058 7-week session

This introduction to macroeconomic theory and policy emphasizes the overall performance of the national economy. Topics include economic growth, financial markets, and the causes and consequences of short-term movements in gross domestic product, unemployment, interest rates, inflation, the budget deficit, and the trade deficit. The course also covers key policy-making institutions, such as the Federal Reserve, and controversies over the proper role of government in stabilizing the economy.

Faculty:

Tanseli Savaser

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30058/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall Fong Auditorium

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Elementary algebra and geometry.

ECON S-10AB Principles of Economics

CRN 30057 7-week session

Faculty:

Bruce D. Watson

David Laibson

Daron Acemoglu

John A. List

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30057/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall C

Mondays-Fridays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Elementary algebra and geometry.

ECON S-110 Quantitative Methods in Economics and Business

CRN 33002 7-week session

This course covers the main mathematical tools used in modern economics and business studies. Topics include elementary set theory, introductory linear algebra including matrices, limits and sequences, and multivariate calculus with emphasis on unconstrained and constrained optimization. Applications and examples are drawn from practical problems in economics and business. This course is particularly recommended for students intending to study advanced economics, finance theory, and graduate business courses.

Faculty:

Gustavo Vicentini

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33002/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 209

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Knowledge of basic differential calculus of one variable is assumed. ECON S-10ab or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

ECON S-190 Introduction to Managerial Finance

CRN 30298 7-week session

This course integrates financial economics concepts and their application in making financial decisions. Students examine the practices and perspectives of financial management, with reference to the foundations of modern finance: economics, managerial organization, and accounting. The course builds conceptual, analytical, and quantitative skills in several topic areas: financial condition and performance, financial planning and control, working capital management, long-term asset decisions (based on the critical concept of net present value, NPV), and financial and capital structure. It introduces the processes of financial engineering, innovation, and restructuring. The roles of economic value added (EVA) and the balanced scorecard concept in developing managerial strategies and incentive structures are also discussed. While it is not a course in personal finance, many of the concepts and techniques lend themselves to both the management of formal organizations, and the lifetime management of personal finances.

Faculty:

James E. Owers

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30298/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 203

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

ECON S-192 Introduction to Capital Markets and Investments

CRN 32419 7-week session

When investing in financial assets, investors need to resolve two major issues: asset allocation (investing in the broad asset classes such as stocks, bonds, money market instruments), and security selection (finding attractive securities within each asset class). The scope of the topic is vast. The idea is to make students life-long learners so they may sharpen their investing skill and style over time from among the many approaches to investing that have been proposed and used. The course is designed to explore the capital markets and investment environment, concepts relating to investment decision making, organization of securities markets and securities trading, portfolio theory, asset pricing models, bond fundamentals and valuation, company analysis and equity valuation, derivative markets, and international investing. The overall objective is to provide an introduction to the framework of modern portfolio theory and investment analysis with which one can critically evaluate alternatives relating to investments in financial securities and construct portfolios with desired risk/return characteristics.

Faculty:

Shaikh A. Hamid

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32419/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

ECON S-1005 Foundations of Real-World Economics

CRN 33373 7-week session

The course discusses complex economic processes in relatively simple terms so that they can be understood without the use of mathematics. The focus is on real-world applications of common-sense economics. We apply the concepts we learn to contemporary controversial topics such as minimum wage legislation, the function of unions, and why the free market overcharges for health care. We explore why the current economy is, using Paul Krugman's words, in a low-level depression and is drifting rudderless. Krugman has also referred to it as a sour economy because it is unable to provide a sweet life for so many millions of its citizens. Economists do not have the answers because they are unable to think creatively about new institutional structures to transition to a full-employment, high-well-being economy. In contrast, in this course we incorporate ideas from psychology, sociology, and political science into our discussions in order to explore these issues. We also discuss ways to restructure the economy in order to extricate ourselves from the mess left over by the bailouts of the big banks. The course includes concepts from both microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Faculty:

John Komlos

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33373/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ECON S-1010 Microeconomic Theory

CRN 30344 7-week session

This course presents the basic analytical tools of microeconomics. We start by looking at the decision making of individual consumers and ask how these decisions can be optimized, or improved. Next, we look at how firms make and coordinate their decisions under varying market structures, including perfect competition and monopoly. Then we look at strategic behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, making use of concepts from game theory such as Nash equilibrium. Finally, we take up topics including bargaining theory, information economics, externalities, public goods, and welfare analysis. Students learn the key tools and principles economists apply to understand a wide range of phenomena, using graphical representations, some math, and plain logic to present the important ideas and solve basic microeconomic problems.

Faculty:

Robert Neugeboren

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30344/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 103

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm.

First year course in microeconomics ECON S-10a or equivalent; Single-variable calculus MATH S-1a or equivalent; also pass proficiency examination.

ECON S-1012 Macroeconomic Theory

CRN 30345 7-week session

In this course we build economic models of growth, unemployment, inflation, and trade. These models are used to analyze fiscal and monetary policies and to sort out the controversies among macroeconomists. Students learn advanced concepts which can be applied to the economic analysis of business and policy situations. In addition to the textbook, students apply data in real time to the models and concepts presented. Concepts from the course are applied to current policy debates in the United States and elsewhere.

Faculty:

Aaron L. Jackson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30345/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 103

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent; also pass proficiency examination.

ECON S-1016 Labor Economics

CRN 33880 7-week session

This course introduces students to the field of labor economics, with an emphasis on current policy issues and new research. Issues discussed include the effects of minimum wages, mandated benefits, immigration, taxes, and transfer programs on wages and employment; human capital and the labor market returns to education; measurement of the value added of teachers and colleges; the effect of unemployment insurance on unemployment durations; the effect of disability insurance on labor force participation; new evidence on income, wage, and wealth inequality and intergenerational mobility. Students learn current econometric and theoretical methods used in applied microeconomics and how to write about and apply these methods in their own research.

Faculty:

Gregory A. Bruich

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33880/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 101

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

ECON S-10a or the equivalent.

ECON S-1024 Economics and Philosophy

CRN 33387 3-week session II

Questions in and about economics that are of philosophical interest arise in at least three areas. First, there are questions about the scientific status of economics. For example, if economic models are literally false representations of reality, how can they aid understanding or action? Second, there are puzzles arising within economic theory, especially concerning the notion of rationality. For example, why model economic agents as homo oeconomicus if such a being would be a rational fool? And third, there are matters concerning the relation between economics and normative questions of economic policy. For example, what would be an optimal savings rate in the very long run? Such questions are conceptually challenging and there is no consensus on answers. This course explores a selection of such questions.

Faculty:

Frank W. Thompson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33387/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 207

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

ECON S-10a or the equivalent.

ECON S-1123 Introduction to Econometrics

CRN 31837 7-week session

This course is an introduction to multiple regression methods for analyzing data in economics and related fields. Students learn how to conduct empirical studies, as well as how to analyze and interpret results from other empirical works. The emphasis is on gaining an intuitive understanding of the principles of econometric analysis and applying them to actual data. We start with the basics of statistics, including some probability theory and basic concepts in sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Topics such as multiple regression techniques as well as issues related to departures from the standard assumptions on the error structure comprise the main subjects to be discussed. Aside from model specification and data problems, the use of additional methods such as instrumental variables, probit/logit, panel data models, and basic time series methods are also part of the course agenda.

Faculty:

Gustavo Vicentini

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31837/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 209

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

STAT S-100 or the equivalent; also pass proficiency examination.

ECON S-1317 The Economics of Emerging Markets: Asia and Eastern Europe

CRN 33001 7-week session

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, the promises and realities of the emerging economies in Asia and Eastern Europe. Some of the most appealing economic growth stories have occurred in these regions since the end of World War II. The potentials of booming markets, fast developing local consumer markets, abundant low-cost labor, and the rising middle class have been the major characteristics of many emerging markets, which have attracted the attention and capital from the rest of the world. However, upon closer examination, we find the landscape is fraught with an ongoing slowdown across the world's major emerging markets and complex economic and financial systemic risks. Special emphasis is placed on the emerging markets' economics, finance, banking, and their economic relations with the rest of the world, as well as the causal factors and limits of economic policy in China, India, Southeast Asia, Russia, and the entire post-Soviet region. Students independently research, write, and present studies about the nature of the rapid economic transformations these countries are currently undergoing and their most recent economic policy strategies. The course relies heavily on the case method to highlight key issues in emerging countries and encourages class discussions and economic policy simulations.

Faculty:

Bruno S. Sergi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33001/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 103

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

ECON S-1345 History of the Global Economy

CRN 33542 7-week session

In this course, we tackle the big questions. Why has economic growth occurred in some societies but not others? Why did northwestern Europe emerge to prominence in the seventeenth century, while East Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America stagnated until the twentieth century? What was the industrial revolution, and why did it occur when it did? What can the history of globalization tell us about economic growth and development today? Did colonialism matter? Why did the Soviet Union experience such rapid growth and such rapid decline? What drove the economies of the United States and Japan to preeminence? And why did Africa lag behind for so long? In investigating these questions, we explore readings that draw on basic economic theory to formulate arguments and produce testable hypotheses regarding historical questions. We develop an understanding of how economists and economic historians use evidence, structure their arguments, and utilize historical evidence and examples to inform modern policy decisions.

Faculty:

Steven Nafziger

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33542/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

ECON S-10ab or equivalent.

ECON S-1412 Public Finance

CRN 33534 7-week session

This course studies the interaction of governments and markets. We cover topics such as taxation, unemployment insurance, welfare programs, social security, health care, education, and regulation. The course emphasizes current policy issues and policy debates.

Faculty:

Daniel W. Shoag

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33534/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 101

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-10ab.

ECON S-1452 Money, Financial Institutions, and Markets

CRN 31138 7-week session

This course presents a moderately advanced overview of concepts and techniques in the fields of money, banking, and finance. It examines the agents, instruments, and institutions that make up the financial system of the modern economy, such as bonds, the stock market, derivatives, and the money market, including the role of banks in deposit and credit creation. Along the way, standard concepts and tools of financial analysis are covered, including the risk-return tradeoff (Sharpe ratio), the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), option pricing theory, and the efficient market hypothesis (EMH) and its alternatives.

Faculty:

Aaron L. Jackson

Bruce D. Watson

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31138/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall A

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-10ab or equivalent and MGMT S-2000 or equivalent. Introductory statistics, proficiency with ordinary college-level algebra (not linear or matrix algebra), calculus highly desirable. An introductory finance class is essential.

ECON S-1460 Economics of Health Policy

CRN 33539 3-week session I

Health care spending has been rising inexorably for decades, now accounting for over one-sixth of the United States economy and almost 30 percent of the federal budget. The ability to think critically about health policy issues is almost a necessity for today's students, whether they plan to work in the health care sector, contribute to public policy, or simply be well-informed citizens and taxpayers. Meanwhile, economics has been emerging as the dominant social science for analyzing health policy questions. This course teaches students (potentially with no background in economics) how to apply economic thinking to a range of important health policy questions, such as: What is the right way to design health insurance plans? How should we improve the quality of care provided to patients? How do we decide whether a new treatment is worth its cost? Why are prescription drugs priced the way they are?

Faculty:

Samuel Richardson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33539/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall 105

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

Principles of microeconomics would be helpful but is not required.

ECON S-1476 International Corporate Governance: Economic Theory in Practice

CRN 31388 3-week session I

This course examines international corporate governance topics that collectively are termed agency theory in modern finance, as applied to the corporation, with focus on the separation of ownership and control and related issues. The formal and informal contracts that bind together shareholders, bondholders, directors, managers, employees, suppliers, customers, and communities are explored. The collaborative efforts as well as the potential conflicts of interest of these various constituencies are analyzed in the context of a changing legislative and regulatory environment. This enables us to evaluate the effectiveness of how corporate objectives are determined and achieved in the United States, Great Britain, Germany, and Japan. Selected cases and readings illustrate research findings and highlight key issues in international corporate governance. The issues raised by continuing scandals are integrated into class discussions. Class discussions include the practical challenges of corporate decision making and the resulting costs of failures of regulation.

Faculty:

Charles A. Moran

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31388/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 211

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor; ECON S-190 desirable.

ECON S-1620 Organizations, Management Behavior, and Economics

CRN 31390 3-week session I

This course examines topics that can be collectively termed contracts and business organization. The problem of economic organization and the problem of social cost are considered along with efficient incentives, design and dynamics of organizations, motivation, and employment incentives. Economic theories of organizations and management are explored using selected cases and readings to illustrate research findings and highlight key issues, including international dimensions. The evolution of corporate structure is considered as a basis for development of a model for the future relationship of economics, organizations, and management behavior. This includes consideration of nontraditional organization and management models to address current and future effectiveness and efficiency of organizations.

Faculty:

Charles A. Moran

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31390/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 211

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

ECON S-1814 Urban Economics

CRN 33152 7-week session

Why are some cities richer than others? What factors determine where people and companies decide to locate? This course reviews the economic forces that matter at the local level and the impact they have on state and urban policy makers.

Faculty:

Daniel W. Shoag

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33152/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 101

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-10a.

ECON S-1816 Economics of Innovation

CRN 33921 3-week session I

This course addresses a topic that is important and timely. It encourages you to use your economics knowledge by reading the academic literature and popular press, by bringing in guest speakers (practitioners in Boston), and by teaching you professional presentation skills. We focus on one key nexus of questions about technological change: how and why innovation occurs, what policies and other factors encourage or discourage innovation, and how technologies develop and evolve in their early life. Using case studies and journal articles as a springboard, we learn the relevant economic concepts as they apply to the topics we cover. We are not limited to events of the computerized age, but discuss technological change from the Industrial Revolution to the present.

Faculty:

Daniel Johnson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33921/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building K107

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent.

ECON S-1900 Financial Accounting

CRN 30072 7-week session

This course is an introduction to financial accounting, its concepts, and the techniques of recording, summarizing, and reporting the flow of financial information through the entity concerned. It offers an understanding of the information flow process and the necessary techniques for analysis and evaluation of the firm's potential in light of historical data. Students can count ECON S-1900 or the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-1000, but not both, toward an Extension School degree.

Faculty:

Richard A. Rivers

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30072/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 202

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-1900 Financial Accounting

CRN 30071 7-week session

This course is an introduction to financial accounting, its concepts, and the techniques of recording, summarizing, and reporting the flow of financial information through the entity concerned. It offers an understanding of the information flow process and the necessary techniques for analysis and evaluation of the firm's potential in light of historical data. Students can count ECON S-1900 or the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-1000, but not both, toward an Extension School degree.

Faculty:

Richard A. Rivers

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30071/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 103

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-1901 Managerial Accounting

CRN 30073 7-week session

This course introduces the principles and methods of data collection and presentation for planning and control, performance evaluation, and management decision making. It emphasizes product costing (both traditional and activity-based), cost-volume-profit analysis, operating and capital budgeting, evaluation of business operating segments, transfer pricing, and relevant costs for decision making. Students can count ECON S-1901 or the Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-1600, but not both, toward an Extension School degree.

Faculty:

Lloyd John De Leon Tanlu

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30073/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 207

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ECON S-1900 or the equivalent.

ECON S-1913 Behavioral Corporate Finance

CRN 31733 7-week session

This course analyzes corporate finance topics through a behavioral perspective, a new strand of research focusing on how managers and firms make financial decisions, and how these choices might deviate from those predicted by traditional financial theory. Compared to traditional finance, which assumes managers are rational and always make optimal decisions, behavioral finance states that individuals are in fact inclined to make psychological and cognitive mistakes. Since corporate managers usually make decisions involving millions of dollars, their behaviors have a direct impact on corporate results; therefore, behavioral finance is likely to be even more important to corporate finance than it is to investments and financial markets. For example, behavioral phenomena can cause managers to take actions that are detrimental to the interests of shareholders; simply identifying behavioral biases at the right time managers could save their firms from potential financial disaster. Applying psychological and behavioral evidence to corporate finance and financial markets, students can therefore learn how managers can avoid these biases, in order to make decisions that are more rational. The course is structured to meet the needs of different types of participants, including students taking the course for undergraduate or graduate credit, or corporate managers or other professionals enrolling as noncredit students.

Faculty:

Duccio Martelli

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31733/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 105

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ECON S-10ab or the equivalent, ECON S-190, ECON S-192, or permission of the instructor.

ECON S-1920 Advanced Capital Markets and Investments

CRN 33011 7-week session

This course is canceled.

ECON S-1925 Emerging Markets: Investment Theories and Practice

CRN 33930 7-week session

Faculty:

Peter Marber

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33930/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Finance and accounting classes would be very useful.

ECON S-1944 History of Financial Crises 1637-2017

CRN 33362 7-week session

Faculty:

John Komlos

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33362/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

EDUC S-037 Financial Management of Nonprofit Organizations

CRN 31667 7-week session

This introductory course surveys the financial management practices and problems of nonprofit organizations, with particular emphasis on schools and colleges, government agencies, and museums. Specific topics include strategic planning, leadership, financial accounting, program budgeting, and financial analysis. The course aims to make students better managers and consumers of financial information rather than budget officers or accountants. The course has no prerequisites, and students who dislike number crunching are especially welcomed.

Faculty:

John Harold Lindsell

Kent John Chabotar

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31667/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G115

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ENGL S-37U Bob Dylan

CRN 33895 3-week session II

This course is canceled.

ENGL S-141 The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

CRN 32780 7-week session

This course is a study of major eighteenth-century autobiographical, fictional, and philosophical texts that explore the paradoxes of the modern self at a time when traditional religious and philosophical explanations were breaking down. Writers to be read include Mme. de Lafayette, Boswell, Voltaire, Gibbon, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos, Franklin, and Blake. Due to the condensed summer schedule, the longer works, such as Rousseau's Confessions and Laclos's Les Liaisons Dangereuses, are read in abridged form.

Faculty:

Leo Damrosch

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32780/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 106

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

ENGL S-182M Poetry in America: From the Civil War through Modernism

CRN 33941 7-week session

Faculty:

Carra Glatt

Elisa New

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33941/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

ENGL S-185 Wit and Humor

CRN 33785 7-week session

Emphasizing wit and humor rather than comedy as classically understood, the course considers selected texts and films (for example, Mark Twain, P. G. Wodehouse, Dave Barry, Dr. Strangelove, Annie Hall, Monty Python) in the light of theoretical studies by psychologists, sociologists, and critics who have tried to explain why people laugh, want to laugh, and pay to be made to laugh.

Faculty:

Leo Damrosch

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33785/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 101

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

ENGL S-191 The Short Story

CRN 33855 3-week session II

The most economical of narrative forms, short stories provide unique insight into how literature works, since they do not have time to set up rules, only to put an original spin on them. They make you see something new. We look at some of the greatest writers of short fiction, most of them from the last century or so when the short story came into its own as a form.

Faculty:

William Flesch

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33855/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 304

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ENGL S-207 The Culture of Capitalism

CRN 33124 7-week session

Faculty:

Martin Puchner

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33124/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

ENGL S-226 Postmodern Literature

CRN 33903 3-week session II

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and themes of postmodernism and contemporary media culture. Students read some of the major literature of postmodernism, along with significant essays in theories of the postmodern. The way postmodern literature explores the tensions between the dream of utopia on the one hand and the specter of apocalypse on the other is one of the chief themes students investigate in this course. Other themes include the phantasmagoria of contemporary culture and the society of the spectacle, the emergence of radical new forms of consciousness and technology, and the ways in which our culture imagines and negotiates with the other through such categories as war, gender, race, the machine and the posthuman. Finally, students consider the question of what it means to be human in a culture mediated by the image.

Faculty:

Patrick Pritchett

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33903/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 211

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ENGL S-300 Poetry in America for Teachers: The City from Whitman to Hip Hop

CRN 33942 7-week session

Faculty:

Elisa New

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33942/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $499

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

ENSC S-135 Biochemical Engineering and Synthetic Life

CRN 33530 7-week session

Biochemical engineering harnesses living cells as miniature chemical reactors, enabling the production of designer molecules ranging from pharmaceuticals to plastics to biofuels. Live cells possess unique capabilities to manufacture complex chemical entities, yet living cells also introduce unique challenges and tradeoffs. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of biochemical engineering, including its biological underpinnings, the flow of genetic information within biological systems, the building blocks of living cells, and cellular pathways and control mechanisms. The course then describes the sub-disciplines of genetic engineering and metabolic engineering, along with applications in specialty chemicals, nutrition, global health, environmental remediation, and sustainability. Finally, the course describes emerging areas of biochemical engineering, including synthetic biology, which enables engineers to create entirely new cells from scratch. The visionary J. Craig Venter has called DNA the software of life, and has proposed that synthetic cells will be part of the solution to meeting global demands. The course discusses the potential and pitfalls of synthetic life.

Faculty:

Sujata K. Bhatia

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33530/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Background in biology and chemistry is necessary.

ENSC S-157 Introduction to Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices

CRN 32627 7-week session

Miniaturization of liquid-based assays used in research, diagnostics, and sample analysis has been gaining tremendous momentum in the last fifteen years. This shift towards microfluidic devices was stimulated by the need for faster, less expensive, and easier-to-use devices that can provide higher throughput, better statistics, and require much less sample and reagents. This hands-on course serves as an introduction to the facilities, materials, tools, and techniques used for the design and fabrication of microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices. It also reviews some of the latest advances in this dynamic field.

Faculty:

Turgut Fettah Kosar

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32627/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Laboratory for Integrated Science and Engineering 303

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

One semester each of college-level calculus, physics, and chemistry, or permission of the instructor. Recently taken Advanced Placement (AP) courses in these subjects are acceptable.

ENSC S-175 Introduction to Semiconductor Device Physics

CRN 33890 7-week session

This course is canceled.

ENVR S-101 Environmental Management

CRN 32382 7-week session

This course examines environmental issues by providing an overview and discussion of air and water pollution, water use and management, energy and climate change, fracking, oil spills, aquatic ecosystems, biodiversity, toxic substances in the environment, solid waste management, and regulatory strategies for environmental management. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course ENVR E-101.

Faculty:

George D. Buckley

John D. Spengler

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32382/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional on-campus sections Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, which students may attend in person, watch and participate in via live video streaming, or watch at their convenience after the meeting each week.

High school biology and chemistry.

ENVR S-111 Marine Policy and Ocean Resource Management

CRN 33867 7-week session

This course is an introduction to marine policy and ocean resource management. Students engage with material focused on fisheries management, whaling, marine protected areas, off-shore drilling, and other topics of contemporary relevance, and also consider the cultural and social ties of coastal communities to ocean resources. The course both introduces students to the field of marine resources policy and the environmental and social implications of that policy domestically and internationally, and develops research skills that are broadly applicable to other policy areas. An interactive marine policy negotiation simulation, incorporating both on-campus and online students, is a highlight of the course.

Faculty:

Andrew Tirrell

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33867/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 306

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ENVR S-116 Energy and Carbon in the New Economy

CRN 33509 7-week session

A new field of greenhouse gas emissions management has emerged, which specializes in helping institutions and corporations identify and mitigate their contributions to climate change. This course builds the skills needed to conduct a greenhouse gas inventory, and reviews the tools and strategies necessary to set and achieve a carbon reduction goal. In the absence of national climate change regulations in the US, proactive corporate and institutional entities are volunteering to set ambitious limits to their emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs), with many setting the long term goal of carbon neutrality. While the political context is still unresolved, early adopting organizations recognize that cutting GHG emissions can result in measurable environmental, social, and economic benefits. As a result, a new field of GHG emissions management has arisen that specializes in assisting organizations to identify and mitigate their contributions to climate change. This course covers the steps necessary to set and achieve a carbon reduction goal, including setting an organizational GHG reduction goal; establishing a GHG inventory; understanding GHG accounting techniques and standards; developing a comprehensive emissions reduction plan; identifying, financing, implementing, and tracking GHG mitigation measures; developing effective public relations or outreach campaigns; participating in the carbon offset market; preparing for future climate change regulations; and managing and sharing the lessons learned and best practices identified during this process. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course ENVR E-116.

Faculty:

Richard Goode

Marlon Robert Banta

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33509/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Required sections Mondays, 6:30-9:30 pm.

ENVR S-117 Sustainability Leadership for the Twenty-First Century

CRN 33019 7-week session

To inspire and enable people to lead effective change towards environmental sustainability, we have created a course to enhance individual change agency skills as applied to a variety of organizational contexts (education, business, government, nonprofit, church, community). The course explores what change leadership for sustainability is, and guides students to advance their related capabilities, competencies, and strategies. The personal, interpersonal, organizational, and technical dimensions of change leadership for sustainability are addressed. A variety of specific case studies and examples of sustainability in practice, including everything from green building design and renewable energy to environmental purchasing are explored. Interdependencies between finance, politics, relationships, capacity building, technology and more are discussed. Students leave with an experiential knowledge of change management because they are required to complete a project involving a real life change leadership project of their choice. Students typically find this project to be both deeply rewarding and central to the development of their knowledge and confidence as change managers.

Faculty:

Leith Sharp

John D. Spengler

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33019/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

ENVR S-129A Local to Global Agroecology: Immersions from Field to Fork

CRN 33868 7-week session

This course is canceled.

ENVR S-129B Assessing the Food-Water-Energy Nexus: Foundations of Global Security

CRN 33862 7-week session

Food, water, and energy (FWE) are boundary conditions for global security and sustainable development. All three resource bases are imperilled at a time when many living systems are declining at an accelerating rate. Students of all ages recognize that our quality of life depends on designing and implementing sustainable solutions to the FWE crisis. The United Nations estimates global population will increase by 31 percent to a total of 9.6 billion by 2050. Demand on FWE resources may exceed recovery and replenishment thresholds within decades. The Food and Agriculture Organization estimates almost 900 million poor people are currently hungry (protein- and energy-deficient) and 2 billion suffer from micronutrient deficiencies. Global food production must increase by 70 percent to meet demand by 2050. This demand could be reduced if the estimated 1.5 billion tons of food currently wasted are recovered and distributed to the needy. A revolution in dietary quality is essential to prevent obesity and diabetes from lowering lifespan. The World Economic Forum projects that global freshwater demand will exceed currently available supplies by over 40 percent by 2030. The International Energy Agency projects that global energy demand will rise by 37 percent by 2040, even higher if the existing fossil fuel and nuclear requirements for cooling towers continue to dominate the sector. Global attention to the FWE nexus is assured because the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are largely dependent on sustainable solutions to the FWE crisis. Improved health and nutrition status of humanity are important outcomes of the SDG process, and the course brings health and economic assessment into the FWE agenda. The FWE nexus is described in the course through interdependent analysis and the use of integrated assessment methods. The impact of climate change on the FWE security nexus is a core theme in the context of the irreversible population shift to urban settlements. Natural resource planning and management paradigms must adjust to the risks of imbalance that threaten food and water security for the poor across the globe. Both country and project case studies are used to assess the environmental impacts of investment decisions in the agriculture, water, and energy sectors.

Faculty:

Joseph Michael Hunt

Scott Horsley

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33862/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 306

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Basic understanding of environmental science and micro- and macroeconomics.

ENVR S-138 Sustainable Finance and Investments

CRN 33151 3-week session II

Financial decisions worldwide are increasingly influenced by the scarcity of resources, the search for profits through efficiency, and climate change. The Dow Jones has a sustainability index and the search for profitability through efficiency has transcended trend, becoming the new corporate norm. This course studies finance and sustainability as integrated subjects beginning with an introduction of financial and investment principles and moving through financial analysis, financing, and valuation. The course covers diverse aspects of sustainable investments and offers tools for effective financial valuation and risk assessment.

Faculty:

Carlos Alberto Vargas

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33151/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 201

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ENVR S-142 Conservation Biology and Sustainable Management of Forested Landscapes

CRN 33141 7-week session

This course provides a thorough foundation in concepts and practices of conservation biology and ecological sustainability, illustrated through the lens of the world's forests. The future of biodiversity and our quality of life depend on how well forests are conserved and managed in the tropical and temperate zones, and contrasts between these regions are a special focus. Ecological concepts fundamental to conservation of genetic, species and ecosystem diversity frame fundamental challenges not only to protect biodiversity, but also to maintain ecosystem services and sustain economic development. The course therefore reviews techniques of economic valuation that guide policy makers in selecting forest land use options. These options, including protected areas, sustainable agriculture and agroforestry, and natural forest management, require evaluation from a large landscape scale and an integrated ecological, economic and sociopolitical perspective. A Saturday field trip links tropical forest land use with New England's forest history and management issues. The only prerequisite for this course is interest in the topic. The recorded lectures are from the 2013 Harvard Extension School course ENVR E-142.

Faculty:

Mark Leighton

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33141/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

This course also includes prerecorded videos.

ENVR S-144 Sustainable Development and Natural Resource Management from Ridgetop to Reef on St. John, US Virgin Islands

CRN 33916 Summer Term 2017

Faculty:

Mark Leighton

Rafe Boulon

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33916/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 22, 2017

Class meetings

Course meets Thursdays via web conference, 7:30-9:30 pm; and in the US Virgin Islands, August 5-12.

Students must be at least 18 years old. Preference is given to candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts in the sustainability program. Admission is based on submission of an application. Late registration fee will be applied after May 15..

ENVR S-147 International Environmental Governance, Policy, and Social Justice

CRN 33398 7-week session

This course examines both the policy decisions and social justice issues that drive human actions and responses to environmental challenges. We begin by exploring three foundational topics: environmental governance, the global commons, and natural resource valuation. Core concepts from these sessions will continue to arise as we progress into classes focused on particular sectors of environmental policy, such as climate change, sustainable development, energy, and conservation. Upon completion of the course, students are prepared to engage with issues from a wide range of environmental policy areas that touch upon a number of social justice dilemmas. In addition, they further develop the analytic, rhetorical, written, and negotiation skills that are essential to environmental policy and advocacy careers.

Faculty:

Andrew Tirrell

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33398/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 306

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ENVR S-148 Environmental Crises and Systems Collapse: Lessons on the Importance of Resilience and Adaptation

CRN 33511 7-week session

Faculty:

James J. Truncer

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33511/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 303

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

ENVR S-151A Life Cycle Assessment: Theory and Practice

CRN 33944 7-week session

This course is canceled.

ENVR S-154 Sustainable Product Design and the Innovation Ecosystem

CRN 33169 7-week session

This course is for anyone who would like to learn how to design and launch a new product with the lowest environmental footprint. Some of the knowledge tools and skills that students acquire in this course are how to do market intelligence (technological benchmarking and reverse engineering), how to incorporate real sustainability into new products (and identify green washing), how to use structured tools to enhance creativity and innovation to conceive and develop new products, how to design and implement a new product introduction process, how to write and submit a patent application to decrease legal costs, how to protect copyrights and trademarks, how to fund intellectual property by using funds from business incubators and accelerators, how to select the right materials and processes to minimize the product's environmental impacts (using green chemistry principles, sustainable sourcing of components, sustainable certification for raw materials to promote conservation), how to reduce energy use by new products, how to build and test prototypes in an inexpensive way, and how to reduce the environmental impacts of packaging and transportation. Students also learn the basic components of an innovation ecosystem and how high technology hubs (Silicon Valley, Boston, New York) work.

Faculty:

Ramon Sanchez

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33169/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 203

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Basic math at a high school level.

ENVR S-158 Industrial Ecology

CRN 33860 3-week session II

Industrial ecology concerns the interactions between and within the industrial systems and the environment through the exchange of materials and energy. It takes a systems perspective in seeking the answers to such questions as how to improve resource efficiency; how to minimize waste generation; which material to use considering their costs, supply security, and criticality; and how to design an industrial process to minimize its resource and environmental risks. Upon completion of this course, students understand the basic concept of industrial ecology, the tools and models that are frequently used in industrial ecology, and how industrial ecology concepts and tools are applied to various cases.

Faculty:

Sangwon Suh

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33860/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 203

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Students must bring a laptop computer to each class meeting.

ENVR S-162 Law for Sustainability

CRN 33295 3-week session I

This course provides an overview of the major environmental statutes and the common and constitutional law that are relevant to the achievement of environmentally sustainable societies. The primary example is US environmental law, but lessons are also drawn from other parts of the world and transnational efforts. Students examine how we can use law to develop a cleaner, safer world, and more stable economies that protect natural beauty and the resources our descendants will need. The course provides an introduction to the broad extent of existing law, and explores how to make it more efficient and effective.

Faculty:

Rick Reibstein

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33295/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 204

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ENVR S-166B Green Infrastructure: Alternative Approaches to Ecosystem and Water Quality Restoration

CRN 33395 7-week session

This course examines a broad range of emerging technologies that are designed to restore water quality and ecosystem health using natural (green) processes that incorporate recycling of nutrients and provide attractive alternatives to conventional technologies. Examples of green infrastructure explored in the course include constructed wetlands, rain gardens, bioretention systems, vegetated buffers, green roofs, blue roofs, green walls, phytoremediation, permeable reactive barriers, shellfish bed restoration, aquaculture, fertigation systems, and ecotoilets. These technologies show significant promise for water quality and ecosystem restoration, with many co-benefits including resiliency to climate change, low energy costs, low maintenance, and local job creation. The course includes two field trips. First, we travel to Cape Cod to visit sites where these technologies are being piloted and to meet with organizations and individuals who are engaged in watershed planning and permitting as part of the Cape Cod Section 208 Water Quality Plan, an innovative regional planning process conducted by the Cape Cod Commission and authorized by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Second we visit multiple sites in Cambridge where green infrastructure has been constructed and learn the background for the projects, how they function, and costs/hurdles encountered in the development. The course provides an opportunity to learn about green infrastructure, the principles of designing emerging technologies, what the technologies are, how they are being utilized, barriers and hurdles for their adoption, and an adaptive management process that can enable the integration of these technologies into our society by managing risks and optimizing benefits.

Faculty:

Scott Horsley

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33395/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 107

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ENVR S-171 Water, Health, and Sustainable Development

CRN 33522 7-week session

According to Fortune, "water promises to be to the twenty-first century what oil was to the twentieth century: the precious commodity that determines the wealth of nations." And the health of nations as well. This course introduces students to environmental assessment methods of water projects and programs, including health impact assessment, that contribute significantly to health protection and environmental sustainability. The course takes three approaches to the water question. The first, a new sustainable development goal (2015-2030), targets water supply and sanitation (WSS) for all. Lectures identify causes of slow progress in the least developed countries and examine how the lives of 2,000 children lost unnecessarily every day to enteric diseases could be saved. We analyze three contributing risk factors (access to WSS, girls' education and life expectancy, and food security including dietary quality). Case studies are drawn from South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. The second approach studies women, watersheds, and the welfare of children, and looks at climate change, persistent drought, and the reclamation of river basins for meeting human needs. We also examine managing the water-energy nexus for population health, with detailed investigation of the future prospects of hydropower as a low carbon source of electricity in rural areas given climate uncertainties, potential biodiversity losses, and peripheral spread of infectious and vector-borne diseases. The third approach involves water planning, technology, and management for healthy cities. The United Nations projects that three-fifths of humanity will live in cities by 2030, and by 2050 one-third may exist in a state of congealed misery in informal urban settlements without suitable aerated housing or affordable water and sanitation facilities. Coastal cities face the further threat of rising sea levels as a direct risk to life and indirect risk to potable water security. Harvard's extensive policy and planning research on China's healthy cities initiative is an important theme for the course. At course end, students apply practical methods that inform prudent investment decisions on water security and safety, and describe evidence-based water planning paradigms that support economic growth, social and health development, and environmental sustainability.

Faculty:

Joseph Michael Hunt

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33522/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ENVR S-173 Introduction to Sustainable Development and Technology

CRN 33646 7-week session

This course examines principles and best practices for the development and transfer of technologies to meet critical needs throughout the world. We begin by exploring the broader concept of sustainable development that integrates natural and social science concerns, and we review past impacts of technology transfer to developing nations that have at times increased landlessness, disease, pollution, and social disintegration. Students apply these lessons as we assess case studies of new and innovative technologies for their potential to enhance economic and social well being while protecting the environment and public health. Cases introduce students to real world challenges in such diverse sectors as food security, agriculture, public health, and energy and build their understanding of planning methods and skills for technology transfer. These include analysis of market, risk to intended beneficiaries, affordability and finance, cultural acceptance, environmental, gender, and health impacts. Students are also introduced to the institutional landscape for development assistance and investment in technology research and transfer including the private sector, multilateral agencies such as the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, and the New Development Bank, bilateral agencies such as the United States Agency for International Development, international nongovernmental organizations such as Oxfam, and national and local nongovernmental organizations, among other civil society groups. We assess the potential contribution of technology in meeting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The course aims to benefit a range of students from those seeking a grounding in technology for development, to those who wish to enhance skills in project planning, management, evaluation, and policy advocacy.

Faculty:

Laurence Simon

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33646/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S003

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ENVR S-176 The Economic Valuation of Ecosystem Services

CRN 33628 7-week session

This course is canceled.

ENVR S-200 Crafting the Thesis Proposal

CRN 31864 3-week session I

This course helps students develop critical thinking, scholarly writing skills, and research abilities while developing their individual thesis proposals. Class meetings feature lectures and discussions on different scientific approaches, group discussions, and intensive, constructive discussion of proposed student thesis research projects and proposals, from definition of research goals and hypotheses through research design and expected data analysis and presentation. The option to develop a thesis proposal early in the degree program allows students opportunities for an extended period of data collection and analysis, required for many types of significant research problems in our field, and earlier identification of relevant courses while completing degree requirements. Ordinarily, students who complete this course can be on track for November 2018 graduation.

Faculty:

Mark Leighton

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31864/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B104

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Students must be candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, sustainability or ecosystems. They must be in good academic standing and have earned a grade of B- or higher in six courses that count toward the degree, including the analytical skills requirement. They must also have earned a satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Students must have participated in the February 22, 12 noon-1 pm webinar to prepare them for taking the course. In the webinar, Dr. Mark Leighton explains the thesis option, provides an overview of the course and the post-course processes of initiating and completing thesis research. He emphasizes background research and drafting the required pre-proposal. The webinar also includes a question and answer session with Dr. Leighton and Dr. Rick Wetzler. Register for the webinar here.

Finally, students must have their thesis topics pre-approved by their research advisor. For approval, please read the Thesis Pre-Proposal Form and submit the required information by May 1. Students who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

ENVR S-599 Independent Research Capstone

CRN 32381 3-week session I

The course provides each participant with a guided immersion in the processes of heuristic question formulation, objective research design, and implementation. Included are hypothesis testing, data collection and analysis, writing, revision, and final dissemination. Four contexts catalyze this integrative work and ensure extensive feedback. Individual meetings of each participant with the course instructor occur throughout the semester, beginning with review of the preliminary research proposal and completion of a needs assessment survey. Subsequent meetings serve to ensure research progress is on track and make full use of available experts, references, and other resources. Lectures and discussions explore challenges and opportunities in boundary delineation and other assumptions, project scoping, assessment of potential impact (and, where appropriate, procedural reviews such as the university's policy on use of human subjects), inclusion of stakeholders, and sampling design; logical consistency, lateral thinking, use and analysis of case studies; benchmarking, bet-hedging; effective writing, graphic presentation and referencing; public presentation and network establishment. Using a recurring workshop format, participants regularly present components of their work-in-progress to subgroups and to the entire class, for review and constructive input. At the semester's close, the professional community is invited to attend participants' presentations of their final research projects. This is accomplished via a class poster exhibition and/or through a web-based video archive of project presentations.

Faculty:

Richard Wetzler

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32381/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 304

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Students must be in their final semester as candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, sustainability or ecosystems. They must be in good academic standing and have completed all prior course work for the program, including completion of the analytical skills requirement. They must have earned a satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Students must have participated in the February 23, 12 noon-1 pm webinar to prepare them for taking the course. Some capstone proposals sail quickly through approval; others bog down in lengthy revisions, delaying course admission. To help students enjoy the former scenario, this webinar streamlines processes of successfully mapping (and navigating via) prospective research directions, boundaries, precedents, assumptions, logic, stakeholders, metrics, costs, and impacts. Register for the webinar here.

Finally, students must have their capstone projects pre-approved by submitting the Capstone Approval Form to their research advisor by April 15. Students should not delay as there is much to discuss to ensure a successful capstone. Students who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

ENVR S-599A Consulting with Clients for Sustainability Solutions Capstone

CRN 33324 3-week session I

The course imparts knowledge and skills for planning sustainability projects and developing solutions for organizations of at least 50 employees including small businesses, nonprofits, or local townships. Sustainability solutions refer to working with a client either as a member of a team or individually developing and delivering a customized sustainability action plan (SAP). Common client goals are reduction of operating costs, minimization of the environmental footprint, and improvement of environmental sustainability practices. Opportunities are identified and initiatives developed in collaboration with the client for both short and long term. Typical areas of focus include energy efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, supply chain management, green IT, and transportation. In support of recommended initiatives, SAPs emphasize a process to foster sustainable behavior, outline key performance indicators to measure performance, and build a sustainability capital reserve to capture cost savings for possible future investments. Deliverables for the course are a SAP and a presentation to the client stakeholders. A substantial amount of time during the course is spent on coaching students regarding how to most effectively work with the clients to address organizational requirements, develop solutions, and present SAPs. Sustainability executives and consultants occasionally serve as guest speakers to share experiences and best practices. The case method is used to provide a participative and realistic forum enabling students to learn about sustainability while also developing the skills to use the knowledge gained. Whether the SAP is developed for a client by a team or an individual, the course structure enables and ensures evaluation of individual student effort through student reflections and a client satisfaction survey. Past clients have included New York City Department of Sanitation, Greater Pittsburgh YMCA, General Electric Applicances, Utah Center for Affordable Housing, and Amazon.

Faculty:

William O'Brien

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33324/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 302

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Students must be in their final semester as candidates in the Master of Liberal Arts, sustainability or ecosystems. They must be in good academic standing and have completed all prior course work for the program, including completion of the analytical skills requirement. They must have earned a satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

Students must have participated in the February 27, 12 noon-12:45 pm webinar to prepare them for taking the course. During the webinar, students are given an overview of the consulting capstone course, receive guidance on how to identify and secure the right client, and how to develop an acceptable capstone project proposal. Register for the webinar here.

Finally, students must have their consulting topics pre-approved by Mr. Will O'Brien. For approval, please submit the Capstone Approval Form to Mr. O'Brien by April 15. Students should not delay as there is much to discuss to ensure a successful capstone. Students who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course.

EPS S-144 Minerals and Gems: Unlocking the Earth's Treasure Chest

CRN 33384 7-week session

Mineralogy is the study of minerals, including their description, classification and origin. Minerals are fundamental building blocks of the solid earth, the moon and other planets. There are more than 4,000 minerals currently known. Our primary focus is on the rock-forming minerals, as well as gems found commonly within the gem trade. We learn about their crystal structure and composition, and learn how to identify rock-forming minerals both in hand sample and in thin section, using a petrographic microscope. Since only non-destructive techniques can be used in identification of gems we learn those techniques. Upon completion of the course the student is able to identify major rock-forming minerals in hand specimen and thin section, describe their physical and chemical characteristics, apply mineral and rock classification systems, understand the origin and evolution of major rock types, develop an awareness of the properties and uses of gemstones, and gain an appreciation for the identifying features of the common gemstones.

Faculty:

Raquel Alonso Perez

Gordana Garapic

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33384/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 314

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

A general science course.

EXPO S-C Cross-Cultural Expository Writing

CRN 33483 3-week session II

Designed primarily for students whose first language is not English, this course offers practice in academic writing for students who need additional preparation for rigorous college writing courses. Special attention is paid to the conventions and practices of American academic writing. Students review the basics of English grammar and syntax while learning strategies of analysis, argument, and source use. Readings include short scholarly essays and excerpts from challenging and provocative longer works. Writing assignments include several one-page response papers and three longer academic essays.

Faculty:

Patricia M. Bellanca

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33483/2017

Credits

0 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

1 Bow Street 317

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

EXPO S-C Cross-Cultural Expository Writing

CRN 31344 7-week session

Designed primarily for students whose first language is not English, this course offers practice in academic writing for students who need additional preparation for rigorous college writing courses. Special attention is paid to the conventions and practices of American academic writing. Students review the basics of English grammar and syntax while learning strategies of analysis, argument, and source use. Readings include short scholarly essays and excerpts from challenging and provocative longer works. Writing assignments include several one-page response papers and three longer academic essays.

Faculty:

Paul A. Thur

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31344/2017

Credits

0 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 105

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

EXPO S-15 Fundamentals of Academic Writing

CRN 33140 7-week session

This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Faculty:

William Weitzel

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33140/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

EXPO S-15 Fundamentals of Academic Writing

CRN 33504 3-week session I

This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Faculty:

Rebecca Summerhays

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33504/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 211

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

EXPO S-15 Fundamentals of Academic Writing

CRN 33217 7-week session

This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Faculty:

William Weitzel

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33217/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

EXPO S-15 Fundamentals of Academic Writing

CRN 33350 3-week session II

This course is designed for students seeking preparation for EXPO 25, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading, a course required for admission to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School. Students review such basics of academic argument as thesis, claims, evidence, and structure. Students complete short writing assignments that help develop the skills essential for producing persuasive academic essays. Students also learn strategies for reading and analyzing complex texts.

Faculty:

Rebecca Summerhays

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33350/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 211

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

EXPO S-20D Writing about Social and Ethical Issues

CRN 33881 7-week session

This course is canceled.

EXPO S-20B Writing About History

CRN 33877 7-week session

Students investigate scholarly debates in history and discover how knowledge of the past is made, challenged, and revised. This course introduces students to a variety of historical methods and sources, including primary documents, artifacts, and scholarly literature. Building on this material, the class discussions and assignments teach students how to participate in debates about historical events and the forces that shape our world. Sequenced writing assignments help students sharpen the skills of analysis, organization, and argument necessary to write compelling essays.

Faculty:

Julia Mansfield

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33877/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Robinson Hall 106

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

EXPO S-20E The Essay

CRN 31290 7-week session

Students read essays that highlight this literary form's variety and richness. They write analytical essays that focus on technique and the way other writers use language. Through sequenced assignments, students learn to transform their own experiences, observations, and thoughts into evidence.

Faculty:

Paul A. Thur

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31290/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 104

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

EXPO S-20A Writing and Literature

CRN 31279 7-week session

Students read literary works and write focused, persuasive essays on literary topics. Discussions encourage students to read closely and think clearly in order to write more effectively. Students learn to write essays that demonstrate their competence as critics.

Faculty:

Thomas A. Underwood

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31279/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 105

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

EXPO S-20A Writing and Literature

CRN 33119 7-week session

Students read literary works and write focused, persuasive essays on literary topics. Discussions encourage students to read closely and think clearly in order to write more effectively. Students learn to write essays that demonstrate their competence as critics.

Faculty:

Elisabeth Sharp McKetta

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33119/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 316

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

EXPO S-20D Writing about Social and Ethical Issues

CRN 33069 7-week session

Students read varying viewpoints on controversial current issues, such as medical ethics, poverty, the environment, race, ethnicity, immigration, privacy, and labor, and learn how to analyze and present conflicting opinions. They learn how to critically analyze texts and write papers in a social science context. They also learn to transform their own assertions and viewpoints into coherent arguments.

Faculty:

Lindsay Mitchell

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33069/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building K108

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

EXPO S-20D Writing about Social and Ethical Issues

CRN 32704 7-week session

Students read varying viewpoints on controversial current issues, such as medical ethics, poverty, the environment, race, ethnicity, immigration, privacy, and labor, and learn how to analyze and present conflicting opinions. They learn how to critically analyze texts and write papers in a social science context. They also learn to transform their own assertions and viewpoints into coherent arguments.

Faculty:

Julia Hayden Galindo

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32704/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

EXPO S-25 Academic Writing and Critical Reading

CRN 33952 7-week session

This course, which is a requirement for students applying to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School, introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum.

Faculty:

Tad Davies

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33952/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-25 Academic Writing and Critical Reading

CRN 33828 3-week session II

This course, which is a requirement for students applying to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School, introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum.

Faculty:

Deirdre Alanna Mask

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33828/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 204

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-25 Academic Writing and Critical Reading

CRN 33685 7-week session

This course, which is a requirement for students applying to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School, introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum.

Faculty:

Brian T. Fobi

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33685/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-25 Academic Writing and Critical Reading

CRN 33154 7-week session

This course, which is a requirement for students applying to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School, introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum.

Faculty:

Thomas A. Underwood

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33154/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-25 Academic Writing and Critical Reading

CRN 33153 7-week session

This course introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum.

Faculty:

Tad Davies

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33153/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-25 Academic Writing and Critical Reading

CRN 33228 7-week session

This course, which is a requirement for students applying to the Undergraduate Program at the Harvard Extension School, introduces students to the demands and conventions of academic reading and writing. It focuses on analyzing texts, building effective arguments, and using evidence and secondary source material. Instruction on the stages of the writing process, from prewriting exercises through rough drafts and revisions, forms a key part of the curriculum.

Faculty:

Matthew T. Levay

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33228/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

EXPO S-34 Business Rhetoric

CRN 34015 7-week session

Faculty:

Franklin J. Schwarzer

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-34015/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

EXPO S-34 Business Rhetoric

CRN 33984 7-week session

Faculty:

Jennifer Ann Doody

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33984/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

EXPO S-34 Business Rhetoric

CRN 33970 3-week session I

Faculty:

Gillian M. Sinnott

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33970/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 212

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

EXPO S-34 Business Rhetoric

CRN 33969 7-week session

Faculty:

Julie Anne McNary

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33969/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

EXPO S-34 Business Rhetoric

CRN 33955 7-week session

Faculty:

Steven Wandler

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33955/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

EXPO S-34 Business Rhetoric

CRN 33687 7-week session

Faculty:

Steven Wandler

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33687/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

EXPO S-34 Business Rhetoric

CRN 32927 7-week session

Faculty:

Thomas Akbari

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32927/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

EXPO S-39 Advanced Essay Writing

CRN 32384 7-week session

Faculty:

Chris Walsh

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32384/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 112

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A beginning writing course, or permission of the instructor.

EXPO S-42A Writing in the Humanities

CRN 33936 7-week session

This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the humanities. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at Extension or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the work of writing in the humanities via focused study in the field of literature. During the first part of the semester, students read and write about literary texts; during the second part of the semester, students develop their own independent research project in a humanities field of their choosing. This project involves developing a viable research question; finding, analyzing, and interpreting resources; and developing and refining an original argument in a final paper. The topical focus of this course is the interdisciplinary study of fairy tales and myths. We begin by examining scholarship on fairy tales from across the humanities (folklore and myth, history, literature, psychology and sociology), with attention to the various theories, methods and evidence that scholars in the humanities use to ask and answer questions. These readings serve as guides for students to develop their own independent projects. Each student chooses a fairy tale or fairy tale motif about which to conduct research. Sample research areas include a particular fairy tale or adaptation, a motif such as stepmother, beast, rescue, barter, hero/ine's journey, woods, or a way in which a modern text employs these stories or motifs. Class activities and assignments guide students through each stage of the research and writing process, from an initial close reading, through collecting and analyzing critical sources, to a formal proposal and annotated bibliography. This process results in a complete scholarly study communicated both as a conference-length (8-12 page) paper and as a conference-style oral presentation.

Faculty:

Elisabeth Sharp McKetta

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33936/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Students entering this course should show a general familiarity with the college-level reading and writing skills taught in EXPO S-25, the Extension School's equivalent of Harvard College's freshman writing course. Students may have acquired these skills by taking EXPO S-25 or by having completed comparable coursework elsewhere. A diagnostic exercise administered on the first day is to determine preparedness. While we briefly review basic expository writing concepts as part of our more advanced study of writing in the humanities, it is not possible to devote extensive time, in class or in office hours, to teach prerequisite skills.

EXPO S-42B Writing in the Social Sciences

CRN 33884 7-week session

This course is designed for students who wish to build upon the skills developed in EXPO S-25 in order to produce more advanced research and writing in the social sciences. The course is also appropriate for students who wish to review their research and writing skills before embarking on a proseminar at the Extension School or graduate study elsewhere. Students are introduced to the various social science disciplines and their approaches, while also learning how to become critical consumers of social science research. Students develop their own independent research project in the social science field of their choosing. This project lasts the entire semester and involves developing a viable research question; learning how to find, analyze, and interpret resources appropriately; and, finally, developing and refining an original argument in a final paper.

Faculty:

Janling Fu

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33884/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

EXPO S-42C Writing in the Sciences

CRN 33356 7-week session

This course provides instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the natural, computational, or applied sciences. Through critical reading of key examples of the genres of scientific literature, students study how scientific texts address an audience, make claims, invoke prior claims, deploy keyterms, and engage quantitative and visual evidence. The course's workshop approach fosters skills in revision, peer review, and research into the scientific literature. The course offers writing strategies for successful communication in the field, including concise sentences, coherent paragraphs, and well-ordered documents. Projects include an academic research paper on a topic of a student's choice in a form common to most scientific disciplines.

Faculty:

Thomas Akbari

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33356/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $1400

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

EXPO S-48 Multimedia Communication: Introduction to Digital Storytelling

CRN 32686 3-week session I

Faculty:

Marlon Kuzmick

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32686/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 104

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

FREN S-AB Elementary French II

CRN 33939 7-week session

In this course students build on their knowledge of the French and Francophone language and cultures that they acquired in their first semester of language study. They expand their vocabulary and learn new grammatical structures while engaging in the analysis, interpretation and discussion of different types of primary sources taken from the francophone world such as literary texts, films, graphic novels or songs.

Faculty:

Tali Sarah Zechory

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33939/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 105

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 1-3 pm

FREN S-Aa or the equivalent.

FREN S-AA Beginning French

CRN 33550 7-week session

This elementary French course provides an introduction to French with emphasis on interpersonal communication and the interpretation and production of language in written and oral forms. Students engage in interactive communicative activities, both online and in the classroom, that provide rich exposure to the French and francophone language and culture. The course addresses the theme of identity through engagement in the discussion and interpretation of various French visual media including video, images, and film.

Faculty:

Franck Andrianarivo

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33550/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 103

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 1-3 pm

GERM S-R Introduction to German for Reading Knowledge

CRN 31302 7-week session

This introduction to German expository prose is designed for students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge of the language for research and study purposes. The course focuses on grammar topics and applied translation, for which texts from a variety of fields are used. No previous knowledge of German is assumed.

Faculty:

Bjorn Kuhnicke

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31302/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 359

Mondays-Thursdays, 9 am-1 pm

GERM S-BAB Beginning German

CRN 31838 7-week session

This intensive summer course introduces the fundamentals of the German language generally taught to undergraduates over the course of two semesters. It focuses not only on grammar and vocabulary building, but also on reading comprehension, composition and speaking ability. In addition to building on language skills, this course introduces students to German culture through discussions of literature, film and other media. By the end of this course, students are able to engage in conversations with native speakers and read German texts.

Faculty:

Alexander James Lambrow

Aleksandra Kudryashova

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31838/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 109

Mondays-Fridays, 9 am-1 pm

Students who have taken three years or more of German at the high school level should not take this course.

GOVT S-10 Introduction to Political Philosophy

CRN 30154 7-week session

This course addresses the big and most interesting questions of politics: What makes authority legitimate? What liberties can citizens claim? What does justice require? Is lying for the public good ever justified? Readings include works by classic authors such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill, as well as modern political philosophers and legal theorists. These readings reflect a wide range of views about such issues as free speech, privacy rights, justice, truth, and equality. The course strikes a balance between breadth and depth so that students are introduced to a range of important issues in political philosophy which are examined in some depth. No background in the study of philosophy is presumed for this course.

Faculty:

Graeme Garrard

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30154/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 102

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

GOVT S-20 Introduction to Comparative Politics

CRN 32003 7-week session

This course provides an introduction to the key concepts and theories in comparative politics. Topics include democracy and authoritarianism, social revolutions, political economy of development, ethnic conflict, modernization, political culture, state formation, institutions, rationality, and civil society. We examine these topics in light of the empirical evidence drawn from Africa (Nigeria and Rwanda), the Americas (Mexico and the United States), Asia (China, India, South Korea), Europe (Britain and Germany), Middle East (Iran), and post-communism (Russia and former Yugoslavia).

Faculty:

Shinju Fujihira

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32003/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S010

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

GOVT S-30 Introduction to American Government

CRN 31773 7-week session

Faculty:

Jon Rogowski

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31773/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S010

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

GOVT S-40 International Conflict and Cooperation

CRN 30155 7-week session

This course is an introduction to the analysis of the causes and character of international conflict and cooperation. Theories of international relations are presented and then applied to contemporary and historical cases. The course begins with a foundational review of the different levels at which states interact and the primary theoretical paradigms in the field. It then addresses how states achieve cooperation in the face of international anarchy, a question that has attracted the attention of scholars since Thucydides. The course next addresses basic bargaining theory, which uses insights from economics to explore how bargaining breakdowns, commitment problems, and incomplete information can lead to war. Thereafter we examine three popular topics in contemporary international relations research: the roles that psychology, leaders, and domestic politics play in explaining international conflict and cooperation. We also explore the sources and effects of international institutions such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization. We spend a week studying terrorism, a problem of particular significance in the modern world. We also look at trade, foreign aid, international development, and climate change. We conclude with international law and an exploration of the future of international relations.

Faculty:

Dustin Tingley

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30155/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

GOVT S-1071 Politics of Religion in Liberal Democracies

CRN 33544 7-week session

This course is canceled.

GOVT S-1078 The Politics of Sports

CRN 33904 3-week session I

This course is canceled.

GOVT S-1113 Democracy's Century: Democratic Transitions in Comparative Perspective

CRN 33159 7-week session

This course addresses the question of tough transitions. Democracy has come to many different lands in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, but its record of success once there has been remarkably variable. Consequently, we ask two interrelated questions, drawing upon both theoretical literature and case studies: what conditions are propitious or deleterious for democratic consolidation? And, in the latter instance, are there ways of overcoming less than ideal starting points? Posing these questions requires distinguishing between the process of democratization and the outcome of a stable, well-functioning democratic regime. In doing so, we examine problematic cases, historic and contemporary, where democracy has survived and thrived despite the initial odds (India, Germany). We also look at democratic reversals, where hopes of competitive elections and representative governance have been thwarted (Russia). The point of doing so is to have students think critically about democratic theory and regime change in order to assess events such as the Arab Spring and evaluate what factors are unfavorable to democracy (and why), as well as whether these might be overcome through institutional design or other means. For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

George Soroka

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33159/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building K108

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

GOVT S-1115 Corruption and Inequality

CRN 33934 7-week session

Corruption and inequality share a peculiar and enigmatic dance that is poorly understood and distorted by ideological rhetoric. But with inequality fast becoming the defining issue of our time, and sweeping anti-corruption efforts gaining steam in developing countries (often with questionable political motives, as recently witnessed in Brazil), there is a pressing need to develop a more precise picture of when and how these forces interact. In this class we answer why corruption sometimes exacerbates inequality, and sometimes does not. We examine the conditions under which corruption stifles economic growth, efficiency, and investment. We also consider the environments in which corruption effectively substitutes for misguided or missing law to "grease the wheels" for investment. We compare two different theories that propose "vicious cycle" relationships between corruption and inequality: the inequality trap (where inequality creates a lack of trust in institutions, enabling corruption that deepens inequality), and the fairness perception theory where if people believe there is already rampant corruption, they behave more corruptly. We investigate many peculiar paradoxes of these themes such as how China has grown rapidly while ranking among the most corrupt countries, and why Latin America is the only region where corruption reduces inequality.

Faculty:

Viridiana Rios Contreras

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33934/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

GOVT S-1130 Intellectual Property

CRN 31596 7-week session

Can anyone own ideas? Who owns the literary, artistic, musical, or inventive forms expressing ideas? This course examines the concept of intellectual property and the legal and social means that have developed over time to encourage and control it. We consider copyright, patent, and trademark regimes, together with related areas such as licensing and trade secrets. Case studies include the problems of the patent system, the growth of university licensing, the unique status of music, the emerging international law of intellectual property, the protection of design and fashion, and the tension between originality and creativity.

Faculty:

Allan A. Ryan

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31596/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 104

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections for undergraduate-credit students, optional sections for graduate-credit students to be arranged.

GOVT S-1241 The Political Economy of Russia and China

CRN 32684 7-week session

Faculty:

Bruno S. Sergi

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32684/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 202

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

GOVT S-1361 Elections with(out) Choice: The People's Will in Comparative Perspective

CRN 33865 3-week session II

This course is canceled.

GOVT S-1362 Political Communication

CRN 33306 7-week session

This course considers the degree to which Americans' political opinions and actions are influenced by the mass media and the influence that public opinion and the mass media, in turn, have on public policy. Topics to be covered include the history of the mass media, recent trends in the media, theories of attitude formation and change, the nature of news, the implications for political communication of changes in media (the rise of the Internet, social media, and partisan media), the ways in which the news shapes the public's perceptions of the political world, campaign communication, how the media and public opinion affect the manner in which public officials govern, and the general role of the media and public opinion in the democratic process.

Faculty:

Matthew A. Baum

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33306/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 110

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.

GOVT S-1511 Global Energy and Environmental Politics

CRN 32090 7-week session

We examine international politics from the perspective of the exhaustibility of global resources and the expansion of global demand. The course concentrates on issues involving oil and other energy sources, global environmental challenges and governance, and the relations of these issues to consumption and development concerns. The course also focuses on global interdependence and the appearance of new institutional frameworks of global public policy making.

Faculty:

Stacy D. VanDeveer

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32090/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 110

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

GOVT S-1540 The American Presidency

CRN 33010 7-week session

The President of the United States is at the center of the American political system and is the focus of great national (and international) attention. This course examines the foundation of the office of the presidency and the sources of presidential power; the evolution of the presidency and the current structure of the office; the way presidential candidates campaign for the White House; the ways in which presidents organize and manage the executive branch; the manner in which they make decisions to shape domestic, economic, and foreign policy; and the relationship of the presidency to other institutions and political actors, such as Congress, the courts, political parties, interest groups, the media, and the public. The course explores the strategic choices available to modern American presidents in their efforts to augment the power of the presidency and provide active leadership to the political system. In addition to providing students with an overview of the American political system from the unique vantage point of the President, the course gives them the opportunity to study one of the most exciting, relevant, and at times controversial, political institutions in the world.

Faculty:

Jon Rogowski

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33010/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S020

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

GOVT S-1550 Domestic Politics and Foreign Policy

CRN 33308 7-week session

This seminar surveys the theoretical and empirical literature on the influence of domestic politics on foreign policy and international politics, with a primary (though not exclusive) emphasis on American foreign policy. Scholars have long recognized that domestic politics influences states' decision making in international trade and finance. Yet, in recent years we have witnessed an explosion of interest in understanding the linkage between domestic politics and international relations more broadly, including the decidedly high politics arena of war and peace. We review a variety of theoretical perspectives concerning both international economics and international security, ranging from the role of individuals and individual psychology, to the influence of interest groups, political institutions, the mass media, and public opinion. The goal is to assess the strengths and weaknesses of domestic political explanations for policy outcomes in foreign policy and international affairs. For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

Matthew A. Baum

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33308/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 112

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

GOVT S-1729 Debates in International Politics

CRN 33627 3-week session II

This course critically examines arguments, analytical frameworks, and possible solutions for major debates in international politics. Students are encouraged to take positions on key economic, security, and global controversies. The course critically examines debates surrounding phenomena such as sovereignty, imperialism, terrorism, world governance, and state failure. And it investigates disputes over international injustice, environmental degradation, global trade, as well as America's role toward China and the rest of the world.

Faculty:

David A. Rezvani

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33627/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building K050

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

GOVT S-1731 The Future of War: Conflict and Order in the Twenty-First Century

CRN 32963 7-week session

This course is about the future of war and considers how both the reasons and the ways states go to war are changing. The course considers questions such as the following: How and why have states gone to war in the past? What were considered legitimate reasons for going to war? How will violence in the international system be governed in a world where norms about the use of force have changed? Specific topics to be addressed include the problem of military force for humanitarian intervention, the future of nuclear deterrence, the dilemma of preventive war, coercive approaches to nuclear nonproliferation, and ethical issues related to military conflicts in failed states or with nonstate actors.

Faculty:

Thomas M. Nichols

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32963/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 104

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

GOVT S-1732 War Crimes, Genocide, and Justice

CRN 31212 7-week session

This course examines the relationship between law and warfare, including the historical evolution of the law of war; war crimes and crimes against humanity, and their punishments; the Geneva Conventions; the growth of international human rights; and the concept of genocide. We examine the trial of Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg, the 1968 massacre at My Lai in Vietnam, the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, the International Criminal Court, and post-9/11 US policies on detention, torture, and trial, including the response of Congress and the Supreme Court, and related topics. The focus is on broad concepts of law, justice, and accountability in warfare and genocide. No prior knowledge of legal or military systems is required.

Faculty:

Allan A. Ryan

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31212/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 201

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections for undergraduate-credit students, optional sections for graduate-credit students to be arranged.

GOVT S-1737 Strategies and Conflict

CRN 32979 7-week session

This course is both an introduction to game theory, and a literature review of rationalist approaches to the study of international relations. It features games like the Prisoners' Dilemma, the Battle of the Sexes, and the Chicken. Students learn how these and related tools can be used to understand and analyze historical and current instances of international conflict.

Faculty:

Muhammet Bas

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32979/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G125

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

GOVT S-1744 Women, Peace, and Security

CRN 33510 7-week session

This course examines the increasingly recognized role of women in global peace and security affairs, as demonstrated by the groundbreaking UN Resolution 1325 (2000), the first-ever US State Department Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, and the lifting of the US ban on women in combat roles (2015). From politics to the military, education, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and grass roots organizations, women are involved in conflict prevention and peace building. The course examines various perspectives on empowering women to play positive, active roles in these areas.

Faculty:

Joan Johnson-Freese

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33510/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

GOVT S-1749 The Political Economy of Globalization: Challenges and Opportunities

CRN 33666 3-week session II

The late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries have brought many unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Even as Brexit has exposed gaping fault lines in the internationalist agenda, globalization and the flattening of the world mean that countries and individuals are intertwined like never before in history. Against this backdrop, standards of living in many countries have skyrocketed, millions of people have escaped poverty, and countless others have capitalized on new opportunities in work and life. At the same time, serious problems have emerged that pose a threat to sustained peace and prosperity across the globe. In this course, we explore the nature of these challenges and opportunities, why they have arisen, and what they portend for the future political and economic trajectory of citizens and societies. Particular attention is paid to topics such as global governance, labor markets, social policy, growth strategies, democracy and human rights, migration, and the environment. By the end of the course, students better understand what globalization is, what aspects of modern political and economic systems are due to globalization, the key advantages and disadvantages of globalization, and how globalization influences an array of exigent policy issues.

Faculty:

Thomas Gift

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33666/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 105

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

GOVT S-1761 The Pacific Challenge: Political and Economic Transitions in East Asia

CRN 33889 7-week session

The course provides a broad introduction to the challenges associated with democratization and development in North and Southeast Asia. We focus in particular on key current policy challenges, such as economic reform, financial regionalism, and transnational regional politics, as well as social welfare and environmental policy.

Faculty:

Jeeyang Rhee Baum

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33889/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 110

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Some basic knowledge of comparative politics and/or East Asian countries is useful.

GOVT S-1900 Crisis and Strategy in American Foreign Policy

CRN 33901 3-week session I

This course addresses the frameworks, patterns, and practice of America's strategic response to crisis. It explores how institutions and policy traditions evolve in response to domestic and international challenges. It also examines some of the key political-military strategies that have been used by policy makers, including isolationism, containment, rollback, selective engagement, and flexible integration. The course assesses challenges that will continue to confront America into the future in the Trump Administration and beyond, including relations with China, terrorism, foreign occupation, nuclear weapons, and domestic lobbies.

Faculty:

David A. Rezvani

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33901/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building K050

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

GREK S-AAB Beginning Greek

CRN 31871 7-week session

This course is designed for students with little or no previous instruction in ancient Greek who are seriously interested in making quick progress in the language. It covers all basic grammar and vocabulary, offers considerable practice in reading prose and poetry, and is the equivalent of the first two semesters of college Greek. By the end of the course students should be prepared and able to read continuous passages in Greek prose (Plato, Herodotus, Lysias) and poetry (Homer, Aristophanes, Euripides) with the help of a dictionary.

Faculty:

Michael L. Konieczny

James Calvin Taylor

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31871/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $

Start date

January 1, 1970

Class meetings

Mondays-Fridays, 10 am-noon and 1-3 pm in Boylston Hall, room 203.

HARC S-183 The Architecture of Boston

CRN 33665 7-week session

This course examines the evolution of Boston's architecture and urban form from the city's founding to the present. Through slide lectures, readings, and walking tours, we study the works of major designers such as Charles Bulfinch, H. H. Richardson, Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Walter Gropius, I. M. Pei, Philip Johnson, Frank Gehry, Steven Holl, Machado-Silvetti, and Renzo Piano. Together we investigate the development of Boston's architecture, park landscapes, and neighborhoods as the town evolved from the leading town in British North America to one of the great cities of the United States. The class learns about the forces that generated Boston's architecture and urban design and the city's important contributions to American architecture, and in the process receives an introduction to American architectural history. To get a vivid sense of the architecture and the city itself, the class takes several field trips to view significant buildings and parks, including a tour of Renzo Piano's addition and renovation of the Fogg Art Museum, led by one of the architect's collaborators on the project.

Faculty:

Alexander von Hoffman

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33665/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 202

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

HIST S-1280 What Is Europe? Politics, Power, and Peace, 1700-2017

CRN 33418 7-week session

This course is canceled.

HIST S-1490 The Vietnam War in American Culture

CRN 32994 7-week session

This course examines the US war in Vietnam from the 1950s through the fall of Saigon and its legacies up to the present. Considering a range of texts by and about soldiers and veterans, policy makers and protesters, reporters and refugees, the course covers key events in the war, as well as representations and reinterpretations of these events in later years. Materials produced during the war are paired with those produced after the war in order to explore Americans' contested and changing understandings of the experiences and meanings of the Vietnam War. Texts include popular films, documentaries, journalism, fiction, letters, diaries, government documents, and war memorials. For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

Steven Biel

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32994/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 133

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

HIST S-1572 The Holocaust in History, Literature, and Film

CRN 33856 7-week session

This seminar approaches the Nazi persecution of European Jewry from several disciplinary perspectives. First, it explores the topic historically using a variety of historical materials dealing with the history of European antisemitism, German history from Bismarck to the accession of Hitler, the evolution of anti-Jewish persecution in the Third Reich, and the history of the Holocaust itself. Texts include primary sources produced by the German government between 1933 and 1945 and by Jewish victims and survivors, documentary films, and secondary interpretations. The aims of this part of the seminar are to give students an understanding of the background and narrative of the Holocaust, to introduce them to the use of primary historical sources, and to familiarize them with some of the major historiographical debates. Students then ponder religious and theological reactions to the Holocaust, using literary and cinematic resources as well as discursive theological ones. They consider the historical question of the role played by the Protestant and Catholic churches and theologies in the Holocaust. The course concludes with an assessment of the role played by the Holocaust in today's world, specifically in the United States. For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

Kevin Madigan

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33856/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 111

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

HIST S-1657 Slaves on Screen

CRN 33555 3-week session II

This course is canceled.

HIST S-1960 The History of the Cold War

CRN 33518 7-week session

This course introduces students to major topics in Cold War history. It begins with a discussion of the diplomatic legacy of the two world wars, proceeds to an analysis of postwar rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, and ends with the fall of the Berlin Wall (1989), the disintegration of the Soviet Union (1991), and the making of the post-Cold War world order.

Faculty:

Serhii Plokhii

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33518/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 110

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

HIST S-1967 The Global Terror Regime in Historical Context

CRN 32150 7-week session

This course is an integrative survey of the world since the end of World War II. It traces the interconnections between and among social, economic, political, and intellectual themes and events that were influential in creating the world the way it is today. The basic structure for the course is a comparison of the Cold War and global terror regimes and how they have affected daily life within various countries throughout the world.

Faculty:

Donald Ostrowski

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32150/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G125

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

HSCI S-124 Making Modern Medicine in America: A History, from 1800 to the Present

CRN 33429 7-week session

Greater Boston has some of the best medical facilities in the country. Modern medicine in this city involves the latest technological innovations, a variety of well-trained medical professionals, and a clearly defined understanding of the human body. How did medicine get to be this way? In this course, we examine the construction of the American medical system through the twentieth century. Why do medical residents do rounds? Why are hospitals often built near universities? Should we be worried about global epidemics, like SARS and Ebola? Where does direct-to-consumer marketing come from? We consider how doctors, patients, researchers, pharmaceutical reps, and the media shape our complex understanding of health, disease, and treatment.

Faculty:

Anouska Bhattacharyya

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33429/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S020

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

HSCI S-154 Art and Science from the Fifteenth to the Twentieth Centuries

CRN 33178 7-week session

This is a wide-ranging course that explores 500 years of the intersections of the history of science and visual culture. Throughout the course we investigate the permeable boundaries between art and science, which have been characterized as polar opposites far too often. Science is stereotyped as an objective and rational pursuit of natural truths, while art is often considered to be a subjective and emotional pursuit of human creativity. We challenge these misguided labels. We also ask the following questions: How does science use art as evidence, an educational tool, or advertisement? Does art ever use science to the same ends? What methodological approaches do artists and scientists have in common? What is the best way to explore these interdisciplinary relationships? This course is intended for students from all disciplines, providing an introduction to the interdisciplinary and growing field of science and technology studies, which explores the role that science and technology play in our society. This introductory course explores these questions while developing students' toolsets as college-level writers and critical thinkers. Throughout the course students engage with and write about examples drawn from the histories of art and science, develop writing and critical thinking skills for an academic environment, and get a taste of the history of science and technology from a visual perspective.

Faculty:

Miranda Andrea Mollendorf

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33178/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 252

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

HSCI S-175 Self and Society: A Cultural History of Psychology

CRN 32974 7-week session

How has the study of psychology shaped our conception of ourselves over the past 200 years? This course examines the various selves of psychology and their refractions in popular, literary, and visual domains in the modern period. Topics include self-reflection in the early modern period; phrenology in popular nineteenth-century science; the rise of experimental psychology and the fascination with psychical research; photography and emotional expression in evolutionary psychology; work and advertising psychology; hysteria and the unconscious; personality and intelligence testing; the psychology of art; cognitive and computational models of mind; and recent developments in positive psychology.

Faculty:

Susan M. Lanzoni

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32974/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 252

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

HUMA S-100 Proseminar: Graduate Research Methods and Scholarly Writing in the Humanities

CRN 33838 7-week session

Faculty:

Peter Becker

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33838/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher in the alternate expository writing course. In addition, at the first meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and capacity for coherent logical argument.

HUMA S-110 Masterpieces of World Literature

CRN 33501 7-week session

This course surveys world literature from The Epic of Gilgamesh to the present, with an emphasis on different cultures and writing traditions. Produced by HarvardX, the course is based not on lectures but on a more vivid dialogue format between instructors Martin Puchner and David Damrosch. The course also includes travel footage from Istanbul and Troy to Jaipur and Weimar and interviews with authors, such as Orhan Pamuk, and other experts. The recorded lectures are from the HarvardX course "Masterpieces of World Literature."

Faculty:

Martin Puchner

David Damrosch

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33501/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Required sections to be arranged.

HUMA S-116 Theatrical Realism and the Avant-garde

CRN 33918 7-week session

Realism has remained a dominant form of theatrical representation since the late nineteenth century. However, as realist aesthetics have evolved over the past century and a half, a succession of avant-garde movements have arisen to challenge that dominance, offering alternative modes of representation and new experiences of the real. This course offers a survey of various modes of realism by pairing canonical texts in the realist vein with contemporaneous avant-garde texts, manifestoes and critical analyses of dramatic form. Playwrights such as Ibsen, Gorky, ONeill, Miller, Williams, Albee, and Shepherd are read alongside texts by Wagner, Reinhard, Adorno, Brecht, Artaud, Marinetti, Cage, Kaprow, Foreman, and others, as we trace this dialectic in theatrical form across the long twentieth century. For ALM candidates in the Harvard Extension School, this course counts for the graduate seminar requirement.

Faculty:

James Stanley

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33918/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

HUMA S-220 Frida Kahlo's Mexico: Women, Arts, and Revolution

CRN 33858 3-week session I

Faculty:

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33858/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 104

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

ISMT S-156 Intermediate Geographic Analysis

CRN 33925 7-week session

GIS is not just for mapping. As an information system and science, it also provides tools and perspective for learning what spatial data can tell us about the world and its geography. It leverages the special characteristics of spatial data and processes to derive more insight from data than a non-spatial approach can do. This course builds on introductory concepts and skills of spatial data management and cartography to cover a range of exploratory, statistical, and predictive spatial analysis techniques, using publicly available and student-prepared datasets. Students use ArcGIS, QGIS, and other tools to prepare and perform the analyses, then visualize and interpret the results. Emphasis is on learning the interpretive strengths and weaknesses of different analysis techniques and drawing valid conclusions from them in diverse applications.

Faculty:

Joshua Lieberman

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33925/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

ISMT S-170 Human Factors in Information Systems Design

CRN 32596 7-week session

While many organizations have outsourced the design of production systems, there is still a need to provide specifications for those systems. In addition, the recent Internet and e-commerce explosion has created an even wider need to design corporate web sites. Organizational practices must exist to make sure designers and developers take into account what we know about human factors engineering. This course focuses on how to gather requirements, achieve a usable first draft, and test and improve that draft. A half-dozen course projects include usability critiques, assessments of users' difficulties in understanding systems, and designs of forms, screen layouts, and icons. A mid-term YouTube video project evaluates usability of various PC or mobile devices. A final project provides prototype screens and an in-depth plan for an actual application.

Faculty:

Dennis F. Galletta

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32596/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B108

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ISMT S-599 Capstone Seminar in Digital Enterprise

CRN 33285 7-week session

This interactive fast-paced seminar focuses on digital technologies as tools for achieving business goals. A digital enterprise is defined as an organization whose business model and operating platform are driven by information technology (IT). Through readings and case studies, we learn how companies transform their processes and systems by implementing digital technologies: cloud services, mobile and social platforms, data analytics, and machine-to-machine communications. Then we roll up our sleeves and build a capstone project, architecting an IT solution for a realistic business scenario. Concepts covered include enterprise architecture, software systems, business processes, service orientation, system integration, and project implementation framework. Our seminar offers an intense learning experience via engaging lectures, case studies, demanding research and reading requirements, and stimulating teamwork.

Faculty:

Zoya Kinstler

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33285/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B104

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Students must be candidates for the Master of Liberal Arts, information management systems. They must be in good academic standing and have completed at least nine courses toward the degree, including all the core degree requirements. Students who do not meet these requirements are dropped from the course. Courses on project management and business writing, such as EXPO S-34, would be helpful.

ITAL S-AA Beginning Italian

CRN 33401 7-week session

Intended and designed for students with little, if any formal knowledge of Italian, this course enables beginning students to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Italian in a cultural context. Classroom activities include listening comprehension, grammar exercises, conversation, and role-playing, with a strong emphasis on oral communication.

Faculty:

Giorgia Corti

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33401/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 210

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9-11 am

JAPA S-C Basic Japanese

CRN 32880 7-week session

This course is for people with little or no background in Japanese. Students develop basic conversational skills as well as basic reading skills in daily life situations. Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students are able to have survival-level conversations and to recognize hiragana, katakana, and aproximately sixty kanji (Chinese characters).

Faculty:

Masaru Mito

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32880/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

JAPA S-BAB Elementary Japanese I, II

CRN 32813 7-week session

This course is designed for people with no background in Japanese. We cover lessons 1-12 of the Genki 1 textbook and lessons 13-16 of Genki 2. The goal for this fast-track introductory course is to develop a basic foundation in the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course introduces basic sentence patterns, vocabulary, and common expressions, which allow students to speak and write about themselves and those topics that are of personal relevance. At the completion of this course, students have survival-level communication skills to communicate solely in Japanese in common situations of daily life. This course also introduces the hiragana and katakana, writing systems and about 210 kanji (Chinese characters).

Faculty:

Ikue Shingu

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32813/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B109

Mondays-Fridays, 8:30 am-12:30 pm

JAPA S-120 Intermediate Japanese

CRN 33130 7-week session

Faculty:

Yasuko Matsumoto

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33130/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B110

Mondays-Fridays, 8:30 am-12:30 pm

JAPA S-Bab or the equivalent of one year of college-level Japanese. Students must pass a placement test given the first day of class.

JOUR S-50 Basic Journalism in the Digital Age

CRN 32314 7-week session

This course is an intensive workshop for those interested in writing for newspapers, magazines, or online news outlets. Assignments may include a short factual report, longer researched article, personal reportage, editorial, obituary, profile, critical review, and query letter. Reporting, interviewing, researching, and writing effectively are stressed. Students write for print, online, and broadcasting news outlets. Ethical, multicultural, and legal concerns for a journalist are addressed.

Faculty:

Lolly L. Bowean

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32314/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Robinson Hall 107

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

JOUR S-100 Proseminar: Fundamentals and Practices of Journalism

CRN 33940 7-week session

Faculty:

Sallie Martin Sharp

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33940/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills.

JOUR S-101 Developing Your Career in Journalism: Essential Skills and Insider Knowledge

CRN 33879 3-week session I

Faculty:

Katherine C. Goldstein

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33879/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 101

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

JOUR S-137 Feature Writing

CRN 33038 7-week session

This course teaches the craft of feature writing, focusing on the development of human-interest reporting techniques that lead to stories that sing with rich detail and narrative style. Compelling stories introduce a conflict that finds resolution. They answer complicated questions through immersion into a subject that deserves time and careful attention. Descriptive scenes, intriguing characters, and active language move the story forward. Students complete weekly assignments that build toward a final magazine-length feature that is worthy of publication.

Faculty:

Jenee N. Osterheldt

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33038/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Barker Center for the Humanities 211

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

JOUR S-140A News Reporting Across Platforms

CRN 32614 7-week session

This fast-paced course explores structures of news writing that fit within traditional and online platforms. Students learn how to write short, concise pieces that are easy to read on mobile devices, breaking news stories that can evolve by the minute, and enterprise reports. In journalism, demand is high for new information but also for thoughtful, unique pieces that display the writer's knowledge of a subject. The course stresses accuracy and fact-checking as well as ethical considerations in journalism and the importance of reporting a balanced story.

Faculty:

Felicia J. Fonseca

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32614/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 112

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

JOUR S-150 Advanced Narrative Nonfiction

CRN 33352 7-week session

This workshop is for students who want to write publishable narrative nonfiction. Come to the first class with your ideas and work in progress. In this course students develop compelling hooks for editors, whether they are pitching narrative features, first-person essays, or profiles. The class explores literary devices, including scene, character and voice. We focus on the roles of research, interviews and observation, and then how to organize and rewrite a piece until the reader can't put it down. We draw inspiration from recent masters of the craft such as Susan Orlean, David Foster Wallace, Ryszard Kapuscinski and Ta-Nehisi Coates. Passionate student participation is a must. Students critique each other's work in an atmosphere that is both rigorous and supportive.

Faculty:

Kurt Pitzer

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33352/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Introductory journalism class or permission of the instructor.

LATI S-AAB Beginning Latin

CRN 31870 7-week session

This intensive beginning Latin course is intended for those who have little or no previous instruction in classical Latin and are highly motivated to make quick progress in the language. The course covers the equivalent of the first two semesters of college-level Latin. It focuses on the acquisition of fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary so that by the end of the course students should be able to read, with the help of a dictionary, continuous passages from authors writing in classical Latin. Those who successfully complete this course should be equipped to enter into the equivalent of a second-year sequence of college-level Latin in the following fall semester.

Faculty:

Keating Patrick Joseph McKeon

Eliza Jane Gettel

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31870/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $

Start date

January 1, 1970

Class meetings

Mondays-Fridays, 10 am-noon and 1-3 pm in Boylston Hall, room 237.

LATI S-102 Catullus: The Poems

CRN 33780 7-week session

Faculty:

Richard F. Thomas

Julia Scarborough

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33780/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 237

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A minimum of one year of college-level Latin or the equivalent.

LING S-101 Introduction to Linguistics

CRN 33391 7-week session

Faculty:

Andrew I. Nevins

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33391/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 302

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

LING S-120 Introduction to Historical Linguistics

CRN 33194 7-week session

This course is an introduction to historical linguistics, the study of language change over time. It covers the fundamental aspects of language change (semantic, phonological, morphological, and syntactic), as well as the techniques and procedures involved in investigating these changes. Students study the comparative method, learn how to demonstrate or refute genetic relationships between languages, and try their hand at reconstruction of prehistoric phases of languages. The course further addresses the issues of long-range comparisons, externally (socially) and internally (structurally) motivated language change, and language contact. More culturally oriented topics, such as evolution of writing, decipherment of forgotten writing systems, and language and prehistory (linguistic paleontology) are likewise explored.

Faculty:

Jeremy Rau

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33194/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 103

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

LSTU S-100 Introduction to Law and Contemporary Legal Debates

CRN 33658 3-week session II

Faculty:

Sharon Fray-Witzer

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33658/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall 105

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

LSTU S-114 Higher Education Law and Policy

CRN 33632 3-week session II

This course offers the opportunity to consider legal and policy matters in a context which every student has experienced, whether they realize it or not. Via collaborative class discussions, small group discussions, videos, the analysis of meaningful and current texts and articles, and keynote speakers, we examine the goals, governance, norms, and ideals of American institutions of higher education and address the nature and establishment of colleges and universities; the relationship of colleges to local, state, and federal governments; and seminal case law and pending legislation. We address important and contemporary issues related to undocumented students; Title IX and sexual assault on college campuses; the academic freedom rights of faculty; the rights of students to be free from discrimination based on race, gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity; affirmative action; rising student debt; and shootings on college campuses. We focus on real time issues with imminent impact on the higher education landscape. The legal and policy issues discussed serve as a gateway to a broader discussion of the role and meaning of higher education in today's society.

Faculty:

Gregory Haile

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33632/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 302

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

LSTU S-121 Global Law, Global History: A Comparative Perspective

CRN 33649 7-week session

In this course students read and discuss writings on global law and history from the eighteenth century to the present. In the process, they develop insight into the relation between the disciplines of law and history. This course allows students to discuss a variety of perspectives on state-building, nationalism, revolutions, empire, religion, and their relation to the world. This course also questions concepts such as civilization and progress and their impact in the history of global order. By introducing questions, themes, and approaches to the study of global law and history, this course provides a conceptual toolbox that may further students' interest in international relations, political science, international law, or global studies. Students may not count both HIST S-1022 (offered previously) and LSTU S-121 for degree credit.

Faculty:

Liliana Obregon

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33649/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Robinson Hall 107

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MATH S-Y Introductory Functions with Modeling

CRN 31920 7-week session

The course explores basic mathematical models as they arise in real-world situations with the goal of understanding the meaning behind mathematical expressions and functional relationships. The course encourages independent thinking while rigorously reviewing basic algebraic and statistical techniques and notation as needed. This course provides preparation for statistics courses as well as for quantitative reasoning components of standardized tests at the secondary school level.

Faculty:

David Abbruzzese, Jr.

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31920/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 307

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9-11 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

Arithmetic and algebra. Placement test required.

MATH S-AR Precalculus Mathematics

CRN 30389 7-week session

A review of algebra is integrated into the study of rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Taught in small sections, the course emphasizes applications and problem solving and provides preparation for calculus and basic science. Graphing calculators are used, though no previous calculator experience is required.

Faculty:

Srdjan Divac

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30389/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 309

Mondays-Thursdays, 4:45-6:15 pm

A good working knowledge of algebra, as demonstrated by a satisfactory score on the math placement test. Students without the prerequisite placement test score are withdrawn from the course.

MATH S-AR Precalculus Mathematics

CRN 30388 7-week session

A review of algebra is integrated into the study of rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Taught in small sections, the course emphasizes applications and problem solving and provides preparation for calculus and basic science. Graphing calculators are used, though no previous calculator experience is required. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Faculty:

Srdjan Divac

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30388/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 309A

Mondays-Thursdays, 10-11:30 am

Required seminar for graduate-credit students, Wednesdays 4-5:30 pm.

A good working knowledge of algebra, as demonstrated by a satisfactory score on the math placement test. Students without the prerequisite placement test score are withdrawn from the course. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School graduate program in mathematics for teaching.

MATH S-1B Calculus II

CRN 30393 7-week session

Galileo wrote that "the book of the universe is written in the language of mathematics." Speaking the language of modern mathematics requires fluency with the topics of this course: infinite series, integration, and differential equations. The course aims to balance applications and theoretical understanding. Graphing calculators can help with understanding certain concepts and are recommended, but exams do not require them. The topics covered are not identical to those of a BC advanced placement class, but do overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Faculty:

Yu-Wen Hsu

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30393/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 216

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am

Required sections for all students Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10:30-11:30 am; required seminars for graduate-credit students, Thursdays, 4-5:30 pm.

A good working knowledge of differentiation and an acquaintance with integration, as demonstrated by a satisfactory score on the placement test. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School graduate program in mathematics for teaching.

MATH S-1A Calculus I

CRN 30391 7-week session

This course covers differential and integral calculus in one variable, with applications. We aim to develop conceptual understanding, computational skills, and the students' ability to apply the material to science. The topics covered overlap with the advanced placement calculus curriculum to a large extent. A graphing calculator can occasionally be useful. Students enrolling for graduate credit participate in weekly pedagogical seminars investigating current research in mathematics education.

Faculty:

Otto K. Bretscher

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30391/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B108

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am

Required sections Mondays, Wednesdays 1-3 pm, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11 am - 1 pm, 1-3 pm, or 5:30-7:30 pm; required seminars for graduate-credit students, Thursdays, 4-5:30 pm.

A good working knowledge of algebra, functions, logarithms, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Placement test required. The graduate-credit option is available only to students participating in the Harvard Extension School's mathematics for teaching.

MATH S-1AB Calculus I and II

CRN 30390 7-week session

This is a very intensive course covering differential and integral calculus in one variable, including series and some differential equations. We aim to develop theoretical understanding and practical skills. Some students leave prepared for multivariable calculus; others leave having previewed one-variable calculus. Graphing calculators are recommended but are not used in exams. The topics covered are not identical to those of a BC advanced placement class but do overlap to a large extent.

Faculty:

Robin Gottlieb

Sarah A. Chisholm

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30390/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 104

Mondays-Fridays, 8:45-11:45 am

Required sections to be arranged.

A strong interest in mathematics plus an excellent facility with geometry, algebra, and analytic geometry, including functions, graphs, exponentials and logarithms, and trigonometric functions. Placement test required.

MATH S-21B Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

CRN 30190 7-week session

Topics to be covered include Gauss-Jordan reduction and systems of linear equations; matrices and linear transformations; linear independence; subspaces; matrices and coordinates relative to different bases; general linear spaces; orthogonality and least-squares approximation; inner product spaces; determinants; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and the spectral theorem; discrete and continuous dynamical systems; phase-plane analysis of linear and nonlinear systems of ordinary differential equations; and function spaces and differential operators.

Faculty:

Robert Winters

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30190/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 201

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

MATH S-21a (taken concurrently if necessary) or the equivalent. Placement test recommended.

MATH S-21A Multivariable Calculus

CRN 30189 7-week session

To see how calculus applies in situations described by more than one variable, we study vectors, lines, planes, and parameterization of curves and surfaces; partial derivatives, directional derivatives, and gradients; optimization and critical point analysis, including the method of Lagrange multipliers; integration over curves, surfaces, and solid regions using Cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; vector fields, and line and surface integrals for work and flux; and the divergence and curl of vector fields together with applications.

Faculty:

Oliver Knill

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30189/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

Two semesters of calculus. Placement test recommended.

MATH S-101 Spaces, Mappings, and Mathematical Structures (With An Introduction to Proof)

CRN 33950 7-week session

Ever wonder where a theorem comes from or why you should believe it? There is much more to mathematics than learning formulas and procedures: studying mathematics is about building and describing mathematical structures, discovering their properties (your theorems), and convincing yourself and others of your discoveries (by writing proofs). In this class, we start from some basic assumptions (no calculus necessary) and reason our way together until we have built and described some important concrete and abstract structures. Along the way, students learn the subtle art of mathematical reasoning, and we convince ourselves of some surprising and sophisticated conclusions, including beautiful results from basic number theory, group theory, and topology.

Faculty:

Dusty Grundmeier

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33950/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 110

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

Imagination, a solid mastery of precalculus, as well as a serious interest in making and critiquing arguments. Placement test recommended.

MATH S-310 Graph Theory: Investigating the Mathematical Process

CRN 33893 3-week session II

How can you visualize your social network to learn about the the way information travels among your friends and family? How can you understand voting patterns in the US Senate and quantify what it means for a senator to be independent? How does a travel website find you the cheapest/shortest/fastest flight from Boston to San Francisco? How can you model disease transmission, cell phone networks, the Internet itself, the way a rumor spreads, or the relevance of a celebrity? The one-word answer to all of these questions is graphs. This course is designed especially with teachers of middle and high school math in mind. By the end of the course students know what it feels like to build a mathematical structure from the ground up. They understand why fixing a language to describe that structure is so critical and, using that language, they are able to read, write, and critique mathematical arguments.

Faculty:

Neha Gupta

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33893/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $1525

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center B-10

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

MATH S-322 Real Analysis for Calculus Teachers

CRN 33508 3-week session II

This course covers the theory behind calculus: the real number system, limits, convergence, continuity, the derivative, and the Riemann integral. Students work in small groups to understand key proofs and develop new proofs.

Faculty:

Paul G. Bamberg

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33508/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $1525

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B105

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.

A good knowledge of the mechanics of single-variable calculus; for example, MATH S-1b or the Harvard Extension School course MATH E-16. Math for Teaching candidates who have the required calculus background can use MATH S-322 in lieu of the program requirement MATH E-16 with prior permission of the program director.

MATH S-323 Vectors: a Tool for Teaching Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry

CRN 33136 3-week session I

Vectors are introduced, then applied to a variety of problems that cover almost the entire spectrum of high school mathematics: solving systems of linear equations, proving theorems of plane geometry, deriving trigonometric identities, and describing motion in two dimensions. This course helps teachers see how the use of vectors can provide a powerful way of connecting many various parts of the high school math curriculum for their students.

Faculty:

Katherine Leigh Penner

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33136/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $1525

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B105

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

Precalculus mathematics plus the ability to differentiate functions of one variable. No experience with vectors is required.

MATH S-332 Mathematical Reasoning: An Introduction to Reading and Writing Proofs

CRN 33910 3-week session I

Ever wonder where a mathematical fact comes from or why you should believe it? What does it mean to prove a theorem, and how do people discover or create these proofs? In this course, we see how proofs are build from the basic tools of logic; along the way, we gain a better understanding of mathematical structure. The class follows a discovery approach in which students create mathematical results together via inquiry based learning while focusing on making conjectures and analyzing mathematical arguments. Students may not receive degree credit for this course if they have already completed MATH E-311.

Faculty:

Jy-Ying Janet Chen

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33910/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $1525

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center B-10

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Solid foundation in precalculus.

MBB S-102 Becoming a Brain Scientist: Neuroscience and Psychology Research

CRN 33663 7-week session

How do scientists study brains, behavior, emotions, and learning? This course is an introduction to how neuroscientists gather data and learn about brain functioning, brain disorders, learning, and behavior. Students spend 10-15 hours each week in a Harvard laboratory, working side by side with research scientists. In addition, the class meets weekly to explore matters of interest to researchers in biological science, neuroscience, psychology, and medicine, including topics such as ways of communicating scientific findings, research ethics and human subjects' protection, and the funding of scientific research. Students read literature specific to their lab experience as well as more general material on research methods and design. A final paper and a poster presentation enable students to communicate their findings to other students in the course.

Participating laboratories conduct research in the following areas: mindfulness and its effects on health, self-injurious behavior, brain disorders and mental disorders, neuroimaging of brain abnormalities, and animal behavior.

Faculty:

Dante Spetter

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33663/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 105

Tuesdays, noon-1 pm

Students must have completed their junior year in high school.

MGMT S-1100 Intermediate Accounting

CRN 33338 7-week session

This course builds on the fundamentals of financial accounting and reporting learned in introductory financial accounting courses. By the end of the course students should have a good understanding of the preparation and interpretation of an entity's financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, accounting for complex business transactions, and techniques to evaluate firm performance. Topics include income statement, individual components of assets and liabilities, stockholders' equity, statement of cash flows, revenue recognition, and accounting changes. Real-life case studies are used to evaluate firm performance.

Faculty:

Vijay Sampath

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33338/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ECON S-1900 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-1200 International Accounting

CRN 33869 7-week session

This course is canceled.

MGMT S-2000 Principles of Finance

CRN 32611 7-week session

Faculty:

Bruce D. Watson

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32611/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

High school algebra.

MGMT S-2020 Managerial Finance

CRN 33287 3-week session II

The objective of the course is to provide the student with the basic analytical tools required to make value creating financial decisions. The student is provided with an introduction to theoretical foundations and practical applications in financial decision making. Topics covered in the course include analysis of financial and operating performance, assessment of financial health, financial planning, working capital and growth management, the time value of money, risk-return trade off, valuation of financial and real assets, investment, funding, and distribution decisions in the context of nonfinancial firms.

Faculty:

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33287/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 102

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-2000 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-2035 Principles of Real Estate

CRN 33385 7-week session

This course offers practical, real-world knowledge for engaging in real estate investment. It is great both for students pursuing an active, full-time career in the industry as well as for students interested in building wealth through passive real estate holdings. No prior real estate or finance background is required. Students learn what drives land values and how to recognize a property's most profitable use. Students explore how market forces shape land use throughout a city, gain insight on why their cities are laid out the way they are, and practice identifying where future growth is most likely. They study investment opportunities created by the lifecycles of properties, neighborhoods, and cities. They learn how to anticipate the boom-bust market cycles which shape the investment landscape. Students receive hands-on experience building financial models, analyzing cash flows, and measuring financial returns of investments. Finally, students learn how entrepreneurs raise capital through debt and equity partnerships and explore strategies for successful investing. The recorded lectures are from the 2017 Harvard Extension School course MGMT E-2035.

Faculty:

Teo Nicolais

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33385/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-2037 Real Estate Finance and Investment Fundamentals

CRN 33506 7-week session

This course is geared toward individuals seeking to become active real estate investors, join or move-up in a real estate investment company, or interested in seeing the real-world application of investment analysis and partnership techniques. Students closely examine the four sources of real estate returns (Cash Flow, Appreciation, Loan Amortization, and Tax Advantages) in crafting investment strategy. Students develop an "Investment Scorecard" for scrutinizing new investment opportunities. They receive advanced training in building financial models and analyzing cash flows in Microsoft Excel. Students practice a rigorous, rational approach to maximizing returns on your investments which includes a framework for deciding when to hold, sell, refinance, or renovate a property. With special emphasis on activities which generate the most value, students develop specific investment goals and criteria. They study strategies for raising capital from investors and work through examples of successful partnership structures. Finally, students learn how to efficiently manage a growing portfolio of assets.

Faculty:

Teo Nicolais

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33506/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-2035 is strongly recommended but not required.

MGMT S-2050 The International Economy and Business

CRN 33137 7-week session

The course focuses on the changing global trading and financial systems and the potential impact on the conduct of international business. The course includes analyses of countries, integration of regions, and various currency systems. The course emphasizes case analyses and engaged class discussion.

Faculty:

Lal C. Chugh

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33137/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 206

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-10ab, MGMT S-2000, or permission of the instructor.

MGMT S-2600 Financial Statement Analysis

CRN 32615 7-week session

This course is designed to prepare students to interpret and analyze financial statements for tasks such as credit and security analyses, lending and investment decisions, and other decisions that rely on financial data. This course explores in greater depth financial reporting from the perspective of financial statement users. Students develop a sufficient understanding of the concepts and recording procedures and therefore are able to interpret various disclosures in an informed manner. Students learn how to compare companies financially, understand cash flow, and grasp basic profitability issues and risk analysis concepts. Students apply analytical tools and concepts in competitor analysis, credit and investment decisions, and business valuation. Ultimately students who complete this course develop a more efficient and effective approach to researching, interpreting, and analyzing financial statements.

Faculty:

James F. White

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32615/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Byerly Hall 013

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-2000 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-2620 Business Analysis and Valuation

CRN 33335 7-week session

Financial statements are important sources of insight as to the financial health, prospects, and value of a company. But just how accurate are these reports? Is management's view trustworthy or biased? What are the warnings? This course introduces a framework for the analysis of financial statements and financial plans, with particular focus on their usefulness in valuing and financing companies and evaluating corporate and management performance.

Faculty:

Ned Gandevani

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33335/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-1900. MGMT S-2020 or MGMT S-2700 are helpful but not required.

MGMT S-2700 Corporate Finance

CRN 33795 7-week session

Faculty:

Ned Gandevani

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33795/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 303

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-1900, MGMT S-2000, or the equivalent.

MGMT S-2700 Corporate Finance

CRN 33044 7-week session

The goal of this course is to develop skills for making corporate investment decisions and for analyzing risk. Topics include discounted cash flow and other valuation techniques; risk and return; capital asset pricing model; corporate capital structure and financial policy; capital budgeting; mergers and acquisitions; and investment and financing decisions in the international context, including exchange rate/interest rate risk analysis.

Faculty:

Hamza Abdurezak

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33044/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 102

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

ECON S-1900, MGMT S-2000, or the equivalent.

MGMT S-2720 Mergers, Acquisitions, and Restructurings

CRN 33548 7-week session

The course focuses on the design, analysis, and implementation of financial strategies aimed at repositioning and revitalizing companies faced with major competitive or environmental challenges, problems, and opportunities. The course helps students to understand how to create corporate value by restructuring a company or by combining businesses. After reviewing valuation methods based on strategic, ratio, and financial forecasting analysis, we analyze cases of the different solutions: leveraged buyouts and recapitalizations, corporate downsizing programs, mergers and acquisitions, corporate spinoffs, divestitures, and joint ventures and alliances. Emphasis is given to contemporary expectations and requirements of good governance, based on the roles corporations play in society, and the timing and principles of merger integration. The course is supplemented by guest speakers including investment buyers and sellers as well as valuation experts.

Faculty:

Kevin F. Wall

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33548/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G115

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

ECON S-1900, MGMT S-2000, or the equivalent.

MGMT S-2740 Investment Theory and Applications

CRN 33313 3-week session I

The course covers the theoretical and practical applications of investments. The topics covered include portfolio and diversification theory, short-term investments, long-term investments, investment banking, security trading, international investing, and mutual funds.

Faculty:

Donald L. Santini

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33313/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 213

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-2000 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-2790 Private Equity

CRN 33375 7-week session

This course is the study of private equity money invested in companies that are not publicly traded on a stock exchange or invested in as part of buyouts of publicly traded companies. The main objective of the course is to provide students with the necessary theoretical and conceptual tools used in private equity deals. The course provides the intellectual framework used in the private equity process, valuation in private equity settings, creating term sheets, the process of due diligence, and deal structuring. Other learning objectives include building an understanding of harvesting through initial public offerings or mergers and accquisitions, public-private partnerships, and sovereign wealth funds. The final objective of this course is to show how corporate governance, ethics, and legal considerations factor into private equity deals.

Faculty:

Viney Sawhney

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33375/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 210

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-2000, MGMT S-2700, or an introductory accounting course.

MGMT S-3012 The Art of Communication

CRN 33039 7-week session

Today's leaders must convey their messages concisely, confidently, and memorably. This course is for students who want to strengthen their public speaking and writing skills, and develop their authentic voices as professionals. We explore speechwriting, public speaking in victory and crisis, communicating from values, and working with social media and the news media. How can you make every communication a dialogue? How can you advance your goals and those of your listeners? How does speaking from the best of yourself give you confidence? How do you distill a message into one memorable sentence that captures your listeners' attention, moves your ideas forward, focuses the problem, and helps you achieve your goals?

Faculty:

Mimi Goss

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33039/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 203

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-4000 Organizational Behavior

CRN 33933 7-week session

This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Faculty:

Paul Green

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33933/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

MGMT S-4000 Organizational Behavior

CRN 33055 7-week session

This course deals with issues related to human behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Conceptual frameworks, case discussion, and skills-based activities are applied to each topic/issue. Topics include communications, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and politics, influence of technology, corporate social responsibility and ethics, conflict resolution, and workplace culture. Class sessions and assignments are intended to help participants acquire the skills managers need to improve organizational and individual performance.

Faculty:

Carmine P. Gibaldi

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33055/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

MGMT S-4150 Leadership

CRN 33824 3-week session I

How do you become a leader? How do you maintain a successful claim to leadership? This course aims to answer these questions with lessons drawn from history, literature, politics, and business. The course is highly interactive, and students are expected to discuss and debate the qualities of strong leadership and followership in class and online. Throughout the course, we welcome guest speakers from business, government, politics, and the Harvard faculty to talk about their perspectives on leadership.

Faculty:

John Paul Rollert

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33824/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 102

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-4165 Making Teams Work

CRN 33613 7-week session

Teams are increasingly used in business, the public, and nonprofit sectors, as well as in academia, to tackle more challenging issues that require a diverse set of skills. Strong teams require capable leadership, attention to process, innovative ideas, excellent communication, and an appreciation for different skills and work styles. While much is known about what makes some teams more successful than others, few people are trained in how to effectively create, build, and manage teams. This course focuses on research and best practices in team formation, working on a team, leading teams, and managing multiple teams. Throughout the course we use readings, discussion, cases, action learning exercises, and team projects as a platform to dissect common team issues, strategies, and tactics to overcome these challenges. We also cover special issues in working in virtual teams, team communication, working through team dynamics, and tips and traps in managing teams.

Faculty:

Margaret C. Andrews

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33613/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-4225 Negotiation and Organizational Conflict Resolution

CRN 33210 3-week session II

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the concept and types of negotiation. It is designed for students who wish to manage individual and organizational conflict and negotiations more effectively based on the premise that those in management positions engage in some form of negotiation daily. Students discuss the meaning, types, and different strategies of negotiation with an emphasis on an integrative, collaborative, win-win negotiation approach. A variety of topics are discussed including, but not limited to, workplace conflict and strategies for diagnosing, alternative dispute resolution (ADR), emotional elements in approaching negotiation and conflict resolution, psychological subprocesses, social contexts, individual differences, multiparty situations, and dealing with impasses. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. The course brings out the significance of leadership in approaching and managing a negotiation situation and organizational conflict resolution.

Faculty:

Diane Frey

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33210/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 202

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

MGMT S-4000 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-4225 Negotiation and Organizational Conflict Resolution

CRN 33547 3-week session I

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the concept and types of negotiation. It is designed for students who wish to manage individual and organizational conflict and negotiations more effectively based on the premise that those in management positions engage in some form of negotiation daily. Students discuss the meaning, types, and different strategies of negotiation with an emphasis on an integrative, collaborative, win-win negotiation approach. A variety of topics are discussed including, but not limited to, workplace conflict and strategies for diagnosing, alternative dispute resolution (ADR), emotional elements in approaching negotiation and conflict resolution, psychological subprocesses, social contexts, individual differences, multiparty situations, and dealing with impasses. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. The course brings out the significance of leadership in approaching and managing a negotiation situation and organizational conflict resolution.

Faculty:

Diana Buttu

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33547/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 202

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

MGMT S-4000 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-4310 Creative Thinking and Organizational Success

CRN 33379 3-week session II

Faculty:

Anne Manning

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33379/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 309

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

MGMT S-4350 Building Strong Alliances and Organizations

CRN 33629 3-week session I

This course is canceled.

MGMT S-5000 Strategic Management

CRN 33845 3-week session II

Faculty:

Areen Shahbari

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33845/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 202

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

MGMT S-5000 Strategic Management

CRN 32578 3-week session I

Faculty:

Mohsin Habib

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32578/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S010

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

MGMT S-5000 Strategic Management

CRN 33361 7-week session

Faculty:

Sharon A. Mertz

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33361/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Course work in accounting and two other functional areas recommended.

MGMT S-5006 Competitive Strategy

CRN 33662 7-week session

This course develops a framework for assessing the strategic competitive position and future performance prospects of a business within an industry environment. Reading assignments serve as the theory base and case assignments serve as the practice base of the course. The course builds on the theories of strategic management and industrial organization to help managers better manage their businesses to achieve competitive advantage. In-class case discussion and exercises require smart applications of theory to real world settings. The course provides and applies related practical techniques to analyze a variety of business situations and select appropriate strategic responses for firms confronting them. Class discussions are geared toward discussions on and analyses of the strategic dilemmas that real firms face as they compete with rival firms in their respective industries.

Faculty:

Noushi Rahman

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33662/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-5010 Electronic Commerce Strategies

CRN 32577 7-week session

This course examines the strategic opportunities and challenges of exchanging goods and services over networks. Students learn how companies plan electronic commerce initiatives and harness networked hardware and software capabilities to improve their relationships with customers, suppliers, and other business partners. Case studies and exercises help students learn how to analyze e-commerce opportunities and risks, and to plan and implement effective e-commerce strategies for both established firms and start-ups in a variety of industries. Effectiveness is evaluated with respect to creating and sustaining competitive advantage. Consideration is given to regulatory, ethical, and societal implications of specific strategic choices. A midterm project analyzes an e-commerce failure selected by the group. A final project proposes a new e-commerce enterprise of the group's creation.

Faculty:

Dennis F. Galletta

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32577/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B108

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

MGMT S-5012 The Art and Practice of Systems Thinking

CRN 33830 7-week session

This course provides an introduction to the art and science of systems thinking that allows managers and leaders to add to their decision-making capacities. Systems thinking is a way of outlining how we see, interpret, make sense, and respond to the complexities we all face on a daily basis. As Einstein once said, "We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that existed when we created them." Systems thinking offers practitioners a new level of thinking and a fresh way of understanding the world around them. Instead of looking at parts of a system to discover how it works, we look at the system in its entirety taking into account its unique interrelationships and interconnections. Even in very simple systems there are numbers of cause-and-effect relationships that have to be known to improve the system. Systems thinking is sometimes difficult to easily describe because it includes our personal values, our shared vision, our assumptions and mental models, as well as our ways and means of learning as a team. It is also a wonderful framework for addressing chronic problems so they can be correctly explained and effectively solved. This course not only provides an introduction to the benefits of systems thinking, but also adds to the leadership toolkit of leaders and managers. We better understand how a system (or problem) grows over time, and we are able to understand the leverage we have as leaders and managers to solve nagging issues in organizations. In essence, systems thinking is a different level of thinking that opens opportunities for alternative understanding, decision, and action not previously recognized or understood.

Faculty:

Jerome Brightman

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33830/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 104

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

MGMT S-5015 Applied Corporate Responsibility

CRN 32870 7-week session

This course examines the role of corporate responsibility as a strategy to improve products, profits, and brand equity. The idea of corporations as simply wealth-creating organizations with no obligations to the environment is no longer acceptable. Globalization and increased transparency of corporate operations have revealed significant variations in how organizations attempt to balance the pursuit of profits and good corporate citizenship. Expectations for measurable progress of corporate environmental programs addressing natural resources, pollution controls, monitoring ethical supply chains, and expanded training of employees are growing globally. Stakeholder expectations have accelerated the need to monetize these initiatives. However, the lack of standardized methodology and metrics has resulted in confusion within many industries, hindering progress. Tracking sustainability progress within organizations has often revealed tremendous opportunities for growth.

Faculty:

Charles Bradford Allen

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32870/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 304

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

MGMT S-5016 Studies in Innovation and Entrepreneurship

CRN 33042 3-week session I

This course examines the literature on innovation and entrepreneurship. The question we ask is this: why do some innovations and innovators succeed while others do not? We use the case study method. Several cases of recent innovations, mostly from the tech sector, are examined in detail to understand the dynamics of success versus failure. Students are expected to understand relevant theoretical frameworks to explain the conditions under which investments in technology can produce payoffs for the innovating firm. The implications for formulating a firm's technology strategy are analyzed. Lectures and discussions are supplemented with extensive use of classic texts in the field, journal articles, and trade press.

Faculty:

Cherian S. Thachenkary

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33042/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 102

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

MGMT S-5018 Corporate Governance

CRN 32881 3-week session II

Faculty:

Richard W. Leblanc

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32881/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 202

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

MGMT S-5027 Emerging Markets in the Global Economy

CRN 32734 3-week session II

This course examines the position of the emerging and developing countries in the new global economy. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and incomes, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. Unfortunately, most emerging countries lack the necessary and sufficient resources, capacities, and institutions to manage globalization effectively. In this course, students study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors (such as the government and NGOs); analyze opportunities and risks presented by emerging markets; and analyze the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets.

Faculty:

Mohsin Habib

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32734/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S010

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

MGMT S-5033 Supply Chain Management

CRN 33018 7-week session

From corporate giants to small businesses, the optimization of supply chain techniques and operations practices plays a critical factor in establishing a competitive advantage. This course introduces the concept of supply chain management and identifies industry innovation, methods of cost reduction, and operations optimization techniques. In addition to hosting industry leading guest speakers, the course follows a case study approach to identify the relationship between domestic and foreign goods supply and logistical efficiency, while examining a number of areas including strategic positioning, environmental factors, and effective supply chain growth and development.

Faculty:

Zal Phiroz

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33018/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-5050 Strategic Resource Allocation and Planning

CRN 33847 7-week session

This course is canceled.

MGMT S-5060 Operations Management

CRN 33843 7-week session

The format of this course follows a case approach, with emphasis placed on assessing and evaluating supply chain strategy, methodology, and optimization techniques. Throughout the course, there are several industry leaders who speak as guest lecturers and share their experiences within specific areas of the supply chain. In addition to case studies and guest speakers, supply chain simulation games form a core component of the course, and allow students to gain a real-time understanding of capacity management, inventory management, and the bullwhip effect.

Faculty:

Zal Phiroz

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33843/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

MGMT S-5070 Decision Support Models and Spreadsheet Analysis

CRN 33848 7-week session

This course introduces nonmathematical managers to the major quantitative models designed for effective decision making in today's complex and increasingly uncertain operating environment. The course is relevant to manufacturing, service, institutional, and government sectors as well as marketing, finance, and management. Topics include goal programming, simulation, decision trees, probability, optimization, and scenario analysis. Emphasis is placed on a general understanding of theory, mechanics, application potential, and user-friendly software packages.

Faculty:

Philip Anthony Vaccaro

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33848/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Emerson Hall 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Rudimentary knowledge of algebra and familiarity with spreadsheets.

MGMT S-5310 Advancement in Nonprofit Organizations

CRN 33840 7-week session

This course is canceled.

MGMT S-5330 Principles and Practices of Fundraising

CRN 33374 7-week session

This course is designed for current or aspiring managers, professional staff, and volunteers in the nonprofit sector who want to become familiar with the fundamentals of philanthropy and fundraising. Anyone working in the private sector with an interest in making a career change may also find the course valuable. Topics include an overview of philanthropy and its importance in today's world, one without borders or boundaries; characteristics of nonprofit organizations and their differing fundraising needs and systems; motivations for giving; ethical concerns; prospect research; types of funding sources; planning; capital campaigns; annual giving; communications; grant proposal writing; solicitation techniques; the increasing impact of global philanthropy; and Internet fundraising. Students are invited to bring to their projects or class discussions their personal experiences in various settings. The basic principles and practices of fundraising, as with commercial marketing, are generic and thus applicable to different missions, sizes, and types of nonprofit organizations. We also make extensive use of a virtual world called Second Life to provide a common ground for interaction among local and distant students. Please note that this course, after the first two classes, consists in large part of a simulation. Students join a simulation team representing a mythical or real nonprofit organization. They work with their team throughout the course to prepare a final presentation for potential donors (played primarily by the instructor and teaching assistants, with fellow students also participating). The course is designed to have students experience, as realistically as possible, what it is like to work in a fundraising environment.

Faculty:

Frank White

Jonathan William Schaffrath

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33374/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-5460 Next Generation Business Models: Creating the next Uber

CRN 33906 7-week session

Why is Uber more valuable than Ford and Avis combined, even though it is only eight years old and does not make or own any cars? Despite its size and growth, why did Uber fail in China? In this course, we explore new ways of creating and capturing value using cutting-edge technologies. These business models can connect people, helping them share goods and services. They can collect massive amounts of information to improve customer value at different points in the sales cycle. They can generate revenue from nontraditional sources. And they can fail. In the course, we discuss a wide range of theories and tools within contemporary internet economics, strategy, and entrepreneurship. Students form teams to develop an idea for a new venture that leverages these theories. Together, we analyze and build the next generation of world-changing business models.

Faculty:

Edward Ladd

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33906/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-5505 Family Business in Theory and Practice

CRN 33400 3-week session II

Faculty:

Devin DeCiantis

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33400/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 104

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

MGMT S-5650 International Business: Context and Strategies

CRN 33651 3-week session II

This course examines the international environment for business and offers theoretical and practical background to implement strategies and marketing for successfully penetrating international markets and managing international firms. Throughout the course we review current news items and relate them to the class topics, look at strategic options for major firm functions such as marketing, manufacturing, materials management, research and development, and finance, and examine how these functions relate to the firm's overall international strategy. We survey theories of international trade, foreign direct investment, international financial institutions, differences in political economy and culture, barriers to trade, foreign exchange, and business-government relations (that is, how government policies in various countries influence the activities of multinational firms).

Faculty:

Jorge Riveras

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33651/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall 105

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

MGMT S-5700 Management Consulting

CRN 33565 7-week session

Faculty:

Mukul Kumar

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33565/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MGMT S-5800 Judgment and Decision Making

CRN 32747 7-week session

The subject of this course is the nature of human judgment and decision making, particularly in organizational settings. Its central theme is the ways in which we depart from, and how we can better adhere to, rational and/or ethical standards in our decisions. The course introduces students to the insights of multiple disciplines, including psychology, economics, and negotiation theory, and devotes considerable time to in-class group decision making exercises. Note: though the instructor is a law school professor, this is not a law school course.

Faculty:

Bruce Hay

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32747/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Wasserstein Hall 1023

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-5800 Judgment and Decision Making

CRN 32989 7-week session

The subject of this course is the nature of human judgment and decision making, particularly in organizational settings. Its central theme is the ways in which we depart from, and how we can better adhere to, rational and/or ethical standards in our decisions. The course introduces students to the insights of multiple disciplines, including psychology, economics, and negotiation theory, and devotes considerable time to in-class group decision making exercises. Note: though the instructor is a law school professor, this is not a law school course.

Faculty:

Bruce Hay

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32989/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Wasserstein Hall 1023

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-6000 Marketing Management

CRN 33650 3-week session I

This course is an introduction to managing the marketing activities of an organization: marketing information systems and research, the marketing organizational system, and the marketing planning and control system. Topics include customer and client analysis, market research, product and service planning, pricing, communications, advertising and sales promotion, distribution management, and the development of strategies. The use of marketing concepts and tools by nonprofit organizations is also discussed.

Faculty:

Nicholas Nugent, Jr.

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33650/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 201

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Introductory accounting course or the equivalent.

MGMT S-6040 International Marketing

CRN 32581 3-week session I

This course explores the development of international marketing programs from the determination of objectives and methods of organization through the execution of research, advertising, distribution, and production activities. Students examine the international similarities and differences in marketing functions as related to the cultural, economic, political, social, and physical dimensions of the environment. Students also consider the changes in marketing systems and the adoption of marketing philosophies and practices to fill conditions in different countries.

Faculty:

Nicholas Nugent

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32581/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Hall 202

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

MGMT S-6000 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-6100 Branding: A Practical View

CRN 33505 7-week session

This course covers the principles and practices of brand management. The course content focuses on applied strategies and tactics used by marketers to build and reinforce successful global brands for products, services, and corporate social responsibility.

Faculty:

Thomas Murphy

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33505/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

An introductory marketing management course or one year of experience in a management, marketing or consulting role in a company or nonprofit organization.

MGMT S-6630 Sustainability Marketing

CRN 33345 7-week session

This course develops the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully market sustainable products and services. At the end of the course students are able to understand the key elements of developing a successful marketing strategy and branding approach for a sustainable market offering. The course also reviews global trends and issues that influence sustainable product success.

Faculty:

Thomas Murphy

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33345/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Introductory marketing or management course or one year of work experience in a business-to-business, business-to-consumer, or nonprofit organization.

MGMT S-6655 Social Media Strategy

CRN 33507 3-week session I

Social media has disrupted communication channels and created challenges for marketing in the digital age. Brands have become perplexed by this new phenomenon requiring a new-found dynamic in their approach to the consumer. In this course, students develop a foundational knowledge of social media to be nimble and adept in the ever-changing social media environment. Students learn methods to be proactive for planning, developing, and evolving their social media strategy. Through lecture, discussions, and case studies, students learn theoretical frameworks to produce an optimal social media strategy. Topics discussed include the importance of foundations of social media, target audience, user-generated branding, crisis communication, and privacy in the workplace.

Faculty:

Leila Samii

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33507/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, Knafel Building K050

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-6000 or the equivalent. Students must bring a laptop computer to each class meeting.

MGMT S-6700 Marketing Research

CRN 33917 7-week session

As an introductory course in marketing research, this course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the research methodology and its implementation in marketing. After completing this course, every student should be able to apply appropriate research methods to practical marketing issues. To achieve this goal, the course focuses on proceeding from management problems, to research questions, through research design and data collection, to data analysis and research report. Students have the opportunity to conduct their own original research and present their results. This is a learning-by-doing course that closely simulates how marketing research agencies and corporations execute and utilize marketing research.

Faculty:

Andrew M. Blum

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33917/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

MGMT S-6000 or the equivalent.

MGMT S-7100 The Economics of Business

CRN 33897 7-week session

This course is canceled.

MUSE S-100 Introduction to Museum Studies

CRN 33278 7-week session

This course provides a behind-the-scenes view of museums from the people who are actively involved in their operations. Students learn about the history and objectives of various types of museums (art, natural history, science, historical, zoological) through panel discussions that involve museum directors, curators, conservators, collection managers, and exhibit designers. The focus is the rich and diverse resources of Harvard University's museums, but there are also guest lecturers from other local museums. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Extension School course MUSE E-100. The course is required for students planning to apply to the Extension School's graduate program, museum studies but is also appropriate for the avid museum-goer who desires a more comprehensive understanding of how museums function. Optional sections will be arranged and may include guest speakers, visits to local museums, and meetings with museum directors, educators, and collections staff.

Faculty:

Katherine Burton Jones

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33278/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Optional sections to be arranged.

MUSE S-102 Proseminar: Writing Skills for Museum Studies Scholars and Professionals

CRN 33935 7-week session

In this interdisciplinary proseminar students develop the writing skills necessary to produce a successful graduate-level research project on a topic relevant to the field of museum studies. During the first half of the course, students read classic scholarly texts in museum studies and complete short assignments designed to hone their use of core elements of academic writing: summary, analysis, argument, counterargument, evidence. During the second half, students write a 10-page research essay that reflects their particular areas of interest within the field of museum studies. In this survey course we study the theory that informs museum practice. In particular, we examine how museums can powerfully mediate encounters with the collective past and reflect the politics of race, class, and gender as well as individual, communal, and national identities. We analyze how museums create meaning and invite interpretation. Furthermore, students draw upon the resources of their local museums as well as Harvard University's own museums to see how they create what James Clifford has called "contact zones" between specialists (such as artists, researchers, scientists, and scholars) and the general public.

Faculty:

Christina Kim Becker

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33935/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

MUSE S-108 (Don't) Steal this Painting: A Burglar's Guide to the Museum

CRN 33902 3-week session I

This course is canceled.

MUSE S-120 Museum Education: Theories and Approaches

CRN 33859 7-week session

This course is canceled.

MUSE S-121 Gallery-Based Teaching and Learning

CRN 33657 3-week session II

Faculty:

Annie V.F. Storr

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33657/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Harvard Art Museums 0630

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

MUSE S-131 Museum Informatics: Leveraging Information to Make Data-Driven Decisions

CRN 33529 7-week session

Museums have managed large amounts of information for over forty years primarily through disparate systems in siloed departments. It is, therefore, hard to see the connections that would logically be present in managing information about people or objects. This course looks at the data systems in use in museums to explore the relationships that may be present. We include the obvious connections between fundraising and membership to attendance and social media. We also take a deep look at collections management systems to see patterns of giving that may be leveraged if connections were made to other data. We look at this information from the perspective of the museum educator. Assembling information on programs offered, attendance, and evaluations informs current and future programs and ensures their success. However, big data goes beyond bringing information about constituents and visitors together. Digitizing historical collections allows researchers to analyze the information in field notes, specimen records, and the scientific analysis conducted during the field work. Trends can be measured and compared to current data giving scientists access to information that may be hidden in the paper records Topics covered include museum data systems, developing an information policy, systems integration, metadata and tagging, and information storage and retrieval.

Faculty:

Katherine Burton Jones

Lauren Marie Vargas

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33529/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

The Harvard Extension School course MUSE E-130 is recommended.

MUSE S-132 Social Relevance: Environmental Sustainability in Museums

CRN 33582 7-week session

The public discussion of the environment and climate change is an important opportunity for museums to connect more deeply with their communities. It is also an opportunity to protect and strengthen these institutions. This course surveys the practical aspects of interpretation and public programming, operational changes, building construction, and community engagement to examine how changes in museum work can deepen museums' connections to their communities and increase museums' charitable value. The course covers the evolution of sustainability in museums over the last fifteen years. Topics include human behavior (the challenge of change, whether in daily practice or major projects, and how museums are so well-suited to support staff, visitors, and communities in making change); mitigation (why and how museums and communities are reducing their negative effects on the environment, and what difference can it make to the environment, the climate, and to social and financial stability); and resilience (why and how museums are creatively helping their communities become more resilient in the face of a changing climate and increased impacts from storm events; how museums can share with the public the scientific and social discoveries enabling widespread change).

Faculty:

Sarah Sutton

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33582/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

MUSI S-10 Fundamentals of Music

CRN 32243 7-week session

An intensive introduction to basic music theory and musicianship, covering notation, keys, rhythm, meter, intervals, counterpoint, melody, chords, harmonic progressions, and small forms. Assignments and exercises include music analysis, composition, ear training, sight singing, keyboard playing, and close listening. Repertoire focuses on classical music from Bach to Brahms but also touches on earlier and later classical music as well as jazz, blues, pop, rock, funk, and world musics. Sight singing is introduced and basic composition exercises are included.

Faculty:

Andrew M. Friedman

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32243/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Music Building PH9

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

MUSI S-190R Technomusicology

CRN 33876 7-week session

Faculty:

Wayne G. Marshall

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33876/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 304

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

PHIL S-4 Introduction to Philosophy

CRN 31849 7-week session

This course focuses on the central questions and problems in philosophy: Why be good? What is knowledge? Do we have any? Do we have free will? Does life have meaning? If so, what? The course is more about thinking than it is about coverage or the memorization of a bunch of facts. Readings are drawn from the writings of major philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Anselm, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Leibniz, Kant, John Stuart Mill, and Bertrand Russell, as well as prominent contemporary philosophers such as Peter Singer, John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Daniel Dennett, Martha Nussbaum, John Searle, Bernard Williams, Judith Jarvis Thomson, Hilary Putnam, and Thomas Nagel. Although the course is called an introduction, it is more an invitation to do philosophy than an introduction to it. Introductions seek to map out a territory or lay the ground for more detailed study. There is some of that here, but insofar as invitations beckon and introductions point, the course beckons students to the study of philosophy rather than points the way.

Faculty:

Andreas Teuber

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31849/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G115

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

PHIL S-12 Deductive Logic

CRN 33526 7-week session

Logic is the study of valid argumentation. A valid argument is one whose conclusion is implied by its premises. By learning to paraphrase English arguments in a formal symbolic language, we clarify this relationship between premises and conclusion, and refine our ability to distinguish good arguments from bad ones. Logic's interest lies in its unique abstractness, and in the combination of that abstractness with mathematical rigor. The principles of reasoning we uncover underlie the aggregation of knowledge. We learn how to analyze argumentative structure, construct counterexamples, and formally deduce one statement from another. Students are expected to work in groups on weekly problem sets that challenge their critical thinking skills. Although there are no prerequisites for the course, some background in mathematics would be useful.

Faculty:

James Pearson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33526/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 103

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

PHIL S-126 Arguing About God

CRN 33861 7-week session

"Faith is a fine invention," according to Emily Dickinson's poem, "when gentlemen can see; but microscopes are prudent in an emergency." This course sees how far the microscopes of reason and logic can carry us in traditional arguments about the existence and nature of God. We begin by closely analyzing classical arguments by Aquinas, Anselm, and Descartes. Pascal's wager is a different approach: it argues that even though proof of the existence of God is unavailable, you maximize your expected utility by believing. We examine the wager in its original home of Pascal's Pensees, and look at William James' related article, "The Will to Believe." The millennia old problem of whether human suffering is compatible with God's perfection is called the problem of evil. We examine this issue in Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, classic sources, and contemporary articles. Students should be aware that, in the classic tradition, this class sometimes resembles a logic course.

Faculty:

Steven B. Gerrard

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33861/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

PHIL S-157 The Art and Science of Memory

CRN 33946 7-week session

Faculty:

Julia Margaret Reed

Yvan Craig Prkachin

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33946/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

PHIL S-164 Facing Evil in the Modern World

CRN 33659 3-week session I

We frequently look upon the modern world and characterize it in naturalistic and secular terms. But at the extremities of human behavior and human suffering, whether individual or social, we find ourselves calling people, groups, and situations evil. What do we mean by this? What is the difference between something being evil, or just wrong? What typifies actions we deem evil and what should we do about them? What does our appeal to evil say about our sense of humanity, religion, God? This course takes up these questions through a variety of lenses drawn from Western thought: religious, philosophical, theological, and ethical. Readings include Jewish and Christian scriptures (Genesis, Job, Paul), classic theologians and philosophers (Augustine, Leibniz, Kant), novelists (Dostoevsky, Dillard), and contemporary critics (Nieman, Arendt, Gouri). The last portion of the course turns from ideas to situations, looking at cases such as the Eichmann trial, the Rwandan genocide commission, and the Columbine massacre to query our contemporary thinking about evil and suffering.

Faculty:

David C. Lamberth

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33659/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 210

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

PHIL S-167 Introduction to Biomedical Ethics

CRN 30201 7-week session

This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of ethics and applies them to some of the most widely discussed issues of the day. Students examine ethical issues that arise in a biomedical context, such as euthanasia, eugenics, reproductive control, lying to patients, and the right to health care.

Faculty:

Eli Hirsch

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30201/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 202

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

PHIL S-178 Philosophy of Race and Gender

CRN 33924 3-week session I

This course examines a number of issues related to race and gender, issues that are treated by many different academic disciplines, and that face us in our daily lives. This course uses the philosophical method: we use careful analysis and argumentation to explore the questions that are at stake while formulating provisional answers that we constantly test against new evidence and arguments. We look at subjects like identity claims, normativity, and ethics in race and gender, as they are philosophically construed, and also take up specific political and social issues of justice in race and gender like racism, sexism, pornography, prohibited speech, gay rights, and equity issues. The learning outcomes of this course include both a thorough understanding of some of the questions at stake in the philosophy of race and gender and the answers that philosophers have given throughout history. This is not, however, a course in the history of ideas. Our examination of the work that philosophers do on these issues helps us understand the issues better. As important, however, is the students' own work on these questions. This is not a course merely about philosophy, but in philosophy.

Faculty:

Julia Legas

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33924/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 208

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

PHYS S-1A Principles of Physics: Mechanics

CRN 33182 7-week session

This course is an introduction to classical mechanics, with special emphasis on the motion in fluids of biological objects, from proteins to people. Topics covered include momentum and energy conservation, kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, oscillations, elasticity, fluids, random walks, and diffusion. Examples and problem set questions are drawn from the life sciences and medicine. This course fulfills one of two semsters of physics for entrance to medical school. May be taken concurrently with PHYS S-1b.

Faculty:

Louis Deslauriers

Suzanne M. Pittman

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33182/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall A

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.

Precalculus.

PHYS S-1B Principles of Physics: Electromagnetism, Circuits, Waves, Optics, and Imaging

CRN 33183 7-week session

This course covers electricity and electric circuits, magnetism, waves, and optics. It fulfills one of two semesters of physics for entrance to medical school. May be taken concurrently with PHYS S-1a.

Faculty:

Girma Hailu

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33183/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall A

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections and laboratories to be arranged.

Strong knowledge of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry is required. This is not a calculus-based course. Background in mechanics at the level of PHYS S-1a is desirable but not necessary if a student is ready to put in extra effort. An acquaintance with differential calculus is helpful but not necessary.

PHYS S-10 Introduction to Theoretical Physics

CRN 33198 7-week session

This course is an accelerated introduction to the conceptual and mathematical foundations of modern theoretical physics, with a particular emphasis on analytical mechanics, relativity, and quantum theory. Topics include the general structure of physical systems, classical mechanics and field theory, orbital motion, the principle of least action, symmetries and conservation laws, special relativity, probability and information theory, and an extensive introduction to quantum theory. Examples are drawn from many areas of physics, including statistical mechanics, Newtonian mechanics, electromagnetism, general relativity, quantum information, quantum field theory, and string theory.

Cooperation and diversity strengthen the physics community. This course therefore prioritizes collaboration and aims to provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for students with diverse identities and backgrounds.

Faculty:

Jacob Barandes

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33198/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center 106

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections Fridays, 12-3 pm.

The course is mathematically intensive and assumes a strong knowledge of high-school algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, as well as a high comfort level with abstract concepts. The course covers relevant topics from high-school physics, differential/integral calculus, and linear algebra as needed, so a familiarity with these subjects, while very helpful, is not strictly required.

PHYS S-25 Introduction to Nanotechnology

CRN 33919 7-week session

The twenty-first century is a technology-centric century driven by the successes of Silicon Valley industries. A revolution in electronics that started with the invention of a transistor and integrated chips (IC), has continued on today, resulting in smaller devices with excellent data processing and storage capabilities. What are the key scientific and technological drivers of Silicon Valley? What kind of innovations in science, materials, and engineering, are needed to define the technologies of the future? The answer lies in applications of nanotechnology, particularly through innovations in nano-electronics and nanomaterials. This course introduces the fundamental principles of nanotechnology in order to understand the collective behavior of atoms and molecules in making devices smaller and smarter in the future. The course addresses advances in present day nanotechnology, as well as the interdisciplinary nature of nanotechnology-based applications involving physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, medicine, environmental science and bio-medical engineering.

Faculty:

Rama Balasubramanian

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33919/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G125

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Precalculus and algebra; high school physics and chemistry recommended.

PHYS S-123 Laboratory Electronics: Analog and Digital Circuit Design

CRN 33872 7-week session

This course surveys practical electronics, from Ohm's Law through microcontrollers, with little mathematical or physical explanation but much opportunity to design and build circuits. Each of the 4-hour meetings devotes about 2 1/2 hours to a laboratory session. The small class size allows a format closer to seminar than to ordinary lecture. Since the course aims above all to enable students to design useful circuits, it concentrates on the most effective techniques, analog and digital: operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. The analog half of the course moves quickly from fundamentals (resistors, capacitors, diodes, inductors) to design with transistors, bipolar and field-effect, and then to the many applications of feedback, using operational amplifiers. The digital half of the course looks briefly at discrete-gate design, then at analog-digital interfacing. Students are introduced to programmable logic devices (PLDs, often called PALs), programming these through a logic compiler (Verilog). Somewhat more than half of the digital content concerns the application of microcomputers, microcontrollers, and the design of their interfaces. The laboratories conclude with a series of sessions in which each pair of students uses a single-chip controller programmed and debugged using a laptop computer. The content of the course is not difficult, but the fast pace makes it a very challenging class, nevertheless. And the course demands a great deal of time. Enthusiasts among our students often spend extra hours in the lab beyond the required sessions.

Faculty:

David Eric Abrams

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33872/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

January 1, 1970

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 9 am-1 pm; and Tuesdays, 9-11 am in Science Center, room 206. Optional sections to be arranged.

Secondary school algebra and, preferably, a course in basic physics. Some previous exposure to programming would be helpful.

PSYC S-1 Introduction to Psychology

CRN 30204 7-week session

An introduction to the sciences of mind, including foundational concepts from neuroscience, evolution, genetics, philosophy, and experimental methods, and specific topics such as perception, memory, reasoning and decision making, consciousness, child development, psychopathology, personality, language, emotion, and social relations.

Faculty:

Jason Mitchell

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30204/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Northwest Science Building B103

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Required sections to be arranged.

PSYC S-380 Field Placement in Psychology

CRN 33206 7-week session

This course is canceled.

PSYC S-980V Summer Seminar: The Insanity Defense

CRN 33640 7-week session

This seminar explores, through case materials and empirical research, the insanity defense in the legal system and its impact on psychology, law, and society. Topics include the history of the defense; the relation among psychopathology, insanity, and diminished capacity; the impact of research in neuroscience on questions of free will and responsibility; the effects of different standards for determining insanity; arguments for its retention, abolition, and revision; whether the defense is or should be available to psychopaths and to terrorists; the impact of religion on it; media and other responses to it; controversies surrounding pre- and post-conviction commitment; and its impact on issues surrounding the death penalty. The course provides background in American law and in abnormal and forensic psychology and analyzes the roles of lawyers and of psychologists, in theory and in practice.

Faculty:

Ellsworth Lapham Fersch

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33640/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 105

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

PSYC S-1014 The Psychology of Trauma and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

CRN 33388 3-week session I

This course explores the psychological impact of trauma from many different sources, including military combat, accidents and life-threatening events, interpersonal violence and sexual assaults, natural disasters, and childhood physical and sexual abuse. Our emphasis is on the psychological theories used to explain and treat symptoms associated with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). While discussing PTSD, we cover diagnostic methods, research on prevalence and policy issues, comorbid psychological and medical diagnoses, and social correlates. In addition to exploring the challenges associated with PTSD, we discuss mechanisms of positive change following a traumatic event, such as post-traumatic growth. Lectures on course topics are designed to be as interactive as possible by utilizing multimedia, in-class activities, small group discussions, and reflection assignments.

Faculty:

Sarah Erb Kleiman

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33388/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 105

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Previous course work in psychology is recommended.

PSYC S-1072 The Psychology of Emotional, Behavioral, and Motivational Self-Regulation

CRN 33432 7-week session

This course covers cutting-edge research on how people acquire self-regulatory skills to bolster their willpower, enabling them to achieve personal, academic, and professional goals. Topics include acquiring expertise, combating procrastination, increasing desirable habits, and overcoming smoking, overeating, and emotional problems.

Faculty:

Richard J. McNally

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33432/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall 401

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

PSYC S-1072 The Psychology of Emotional, Behavioral, and Motivational Self-Regulation

CRN 33216 7-week session

This course covers cutting-edge research on how people acquire self-regulatory skills to bolster their willpower, enabling them to achieve personal, academic, and professional goals. Topics include acquiring expertise, combating procrastination, increasing desirable habits, and overcoming smoking, overeating, and emotional problems.

Faculty:

Richard J. McNally

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33216/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall 401

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

PSYC S-1151 Sensation and Perception

CRN 33905 7-week session

What is the secret of Mona Lisa's smile? How are we able to decipher the puzzle of Chuck Close's portraits? Why do Claude Monet's fields of flowers seem to wave in the breeze? Why do we sometimes experience an intense, euphoric response (sometimes described as shivers-down-the-spine or chills) when we listen to music such as Barber's Adagio for Strings? Why do chili peppers taste hot and peppermints taste cold? Why do amputees experience phantom limb syndrome? Can spiritual practices like meditation actually reduce the perception of pain? This course attempts to answer these questions and more in the context of a broad introduction to the foundational concepts of human sensation and perception. Topics covered include transduction mechanisms of primary sensory organs (eyes, ears, tongue, skin, and nose), mechanisms of early visual cortex, perception, and recognition (of objects, color, motion, and space), attention, hearing physiology and psychoacoustics, music and speech perception, spatial orientation and the vestibular system, haptic sensation (of pain, pressure, and sexual stimulation), olfaction, flavor, and taste. We also discuss the effects of brain damage, genetic variation, and disease on sensation and perception. Students become familiar with theories and data from cognitive, neuroimaging, neuropsychological, and neurobiological perspectives.

Faculty:

Justin Vincent

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33905/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 304

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

PSYC S-1 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC S-1240 Abnormal Psychology

CRN 33784 7-week session

This course is an introduction to the study of psychopathology. It focuses on theoretical models of abnormal behavior as they relate to the definition, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. Diagnostic classification, and behavioral and biological features of the major syndromes of psychopathology are emphasized.

Faculty:

Shelley H. Carson

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33784/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall B1

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

An introductory course in psychology.

PSYC S-1415 Dopamine

CRN 33938 7-week session

Faculty:

Simon Barak Caine

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33938/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 112

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

No science background is necessary; however, an inclination for scientific material, and prior introductory coursework in neurobiology, neurosciences, physiological psychology, medical sciences, systems physiology, or biology would be helpful.

PSYC S-1470 The Psychology of Eating

CRN 33614 7-week session

This course explores the manifold physiological, nutritional, behavioral, and sociocultural factors mediating why we eat, what we eat, and how we eat. Topics covered in the course include sensory systems and eating experience, biological mechanisms of hunger and satiety, social influence over food consumption, stress and comfort foods, eating and health, and maladaptive eating behaviors. Section meetings provide opportunities for in-depth discussion of contemporary material as well as participation in individual and group projects.

Faculty:

Adam J. Wenzel

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33614/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall A

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

PSYC S-1507 Psychology of Diversity

CRN 32397 7-week session

The United States is increasingly diverse and the world increasingly globalized. The central focus of the course is on the links between diversity and psychological processes at individual, interpersonal, and international levels. We consider several basic questions: What is diversity? How do race, nationality, and religion influence individuals? What impact does diversity have on cross-group relationships? How is diversity related to people's perceptions of fairness and justice? What is the relevance of people's perceptions of fairness and justice to social problems and social change? Does respect for diversity promote peace and positive change? Much research has addressed these questions, and we closely examine the evidence that has emerged so far.

Faculty:

Mona S. Weissmark

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32397/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

PSYC S-1760 Why People Change: The Psychology of Influence

CRN 30207 7-week session

This course is canceled.

PSYC S-1870 Law and Psychology

CRN 30208 7-week session

This course compares legal and psychological approaches to human behavior and considers their interaction. Topics include criminal, ethnic, and racial profiling; true and false confessions; the insanity defense; civil and criminal commitment; expert witnesses; eyewitness identification and testimony; juries; punishment and rehabilitation; sexual behavior; and victimless crimes. It provides background in American law and in abnormal and forensic psychology and analyzes the roles of lawyers and of psychologists, in theory and in practice. It focuses on research in law and in psychology and neuroscience, and on case studies.

Faculty:

Ellsworth Lapham Fersch

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30208/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall Fong Auditorium

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

PSYC S-1880 Introduction to Clinical Psychology

CRN 33667 3-week session II

Clinical psychology is a diverse and compelling field. Clinical psychologists research, assess, and treat mental illness. They work with people to help them adjust to challenges and heal after losses. They can develop and use empirically validated treatments to alleviate suffering and to improve functioning. They also can assess human abilities and personality traits. This course introduces students to clinical psychology, including topics such as the history of treatment, the role of science in clinical psychology, and the main paradigms that inform treatment and research. The course also explores some of the most common mental illnesses. We consider challenges and controversies in the field. In addition, we learn about preparing for graduate school in clinical psychology or related fields.

Faculty:

Cynthia A. Meyersburg

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33667/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall 105

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Introduction to psychology or permission of the instructor.

RELI S-1010 World Religions

CRN 32778 7-week session

Faculty:

Christopher S. Queen

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32778/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G125

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

RELI S-1063 Literature of Journey and Quest

CRN 32543 7-week session

This course explores the theme of journey and quest in the company of great travelers, among them the ancient Mesopotamian hero, Gilgamesh, the Japanese Haiku poet, Basho, and the nameless man and boy who travel across the landscape of Cormac McCarthy's The Road. Through direct encounter with imaginative literary works from a variety of contexts and genres, we consider the relationship between interior journeys and journeys through external landscapes, between home and exile, between bewilderment and certainty, and between the religious and literary dimensions of literature itself. Special attention is given to the religious dimension of the human practice of making journeys and quests.

Faculty:

Stephanie A. Paulsell

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32543/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 105

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

RELI S-1504 Religious Liberty: Contested American Stories

CRN 33556 7-week session

This course traces the question of religious liberty from the early colonial period to the present. From the hanging of Quaker missionaries on Boston Common to Jefferson's Virginia statute for disestablishment, from the controversy over Catholic schools in the nineteenth century to the Jehovah's Witnesses' refusal to pledge allegiance in the twentieth to the questions of contraception today, we watch the issues and the arguments evolve over the long course of American history. As seen, for instance, in campaigns to protect traditional Native American cultural practices, the processes of defining and applying the concept of religious liberty touch on the most basic concerns of what it means to be an American and what it means to be human. The culminating course project is a historical analysis of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978, using it as a landmark episode in this history, one that exposes many of the hopes and conflicts that surround the quest for religious liberty.

Faculty:

David F. Holland

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33556/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

RELI S-1508 Religion, Media, and American Popular Culture

CRN 33870 3-week session II

Faculty:

Christopher Glen White

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33870/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

July 10, 2017

Class meetings

Robinson Hall 106

Mondays-Thursdays, noon-3 pm

RELI S-1520 Religion, Conflict, and Peace in Contemporary Global Affairs

CRN 33951 7-week session

In this course, we explore a series of contemporary conflicts in different regions of the world with a special focus on identifying and analyzing the diverse and complex roles that religions play in both promoting and mitigating violence in each context. Students learn a method for recognizing and analyzing how religious ideologies are embedded in all arenas of human agency and not isolated from political, economic, and cultural life as is often assumed. In addition to examining the conflicts themselves, we also explore the religious dimensions of the impacts those conflicts have on civic life in areas such as public health, education, and commerce. What roles do religions play in fostering violence and what roles do they play in promoting peace? How do religious institutions and ideologies function to support and/or thwart public health initiatives? What are the ideological justifications for functional economic policies and how do they reflect and/or challenge diverse religious values? What roles do religions play in advancing or suppressing educational opportunities and for whom? Are media representations of the religious dimensions of conflict accurate? Possible countries of focus include Brazil, Egypt, France, Israel/Palestine, Myanmar, Nigeria, Qatar, the Philippines, Somalia, Syria, Turkey, and the United States. The course is especially relevant for aspiring or professional educators, journalists, public health workers, foreign service officers, and government officials who wish to better understand how religions function in contemporary world affairs.

Faculty:

Diane L. Moore

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33951/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

RELI S-1805 Islam: Fundamentals of Thought and Practice

CRN 32701 7-week session

This course seeks to introduce students to the core beliefs and practices of Islam, with special focus on how Islam has manifested in diverse cultures throughout its vast history (China, Spain, the United States, and the Middle East). Students obtain a comprehensive literacy in the subject of Islam, enabling them to better interpret the various literary, cultural, artistic, religious, or political expressions of Islam in history and the modern world. Topics explored include theology, ritual, art, music, law, politics, and Sufism. Students have opportunities to relate course material to their own interests through research papers and presentations.

Faculty:

Aaron Spevack

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32701/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 307

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

RUSS S-AAB Intensive Elementary Russian

CRN 30222 7-week session

This intensive course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Russian language and culture for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. Designed for students without any previous knowledge of Russian, the course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing). Students are introduced to Russian culture through readings, screenings, class discussions, and city outings. This course prepares students to continue in Russian at the intermediate level or for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries.

Faculty:

Natalia A. Reed

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30222/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

January 1, 1970

Class meetings

Mondays-Fridays, 9 am-12:30 pm and 2-3 pm in Barker Center, room 316.

SANS S-101 Beginning Sanskrit

CRN 32541 7-week session

This course, equivalent to two semesters of coursework, enables students to acquire the basic reading skills in Sanskrit. Stress is placed on learning the Devanagari script, basic grammar, and essential vocabulary. Emphasis is also given to correct translation of passages ranging from simple narrative literature to the epics.

Faculty:

Michael E. J. Witzel

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32541/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

1 Bow Street 317

Mondays-Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Knowledge of Latin, Greek, Hindi, or another Indian language is useful but not required.

SOCI S-11 Introduction to Sociology: Perspectives on Society and the Individual

CRN 33126 7-week session

What is society? How can we understand it? What is the role of the individual in society, and how does society affect individual lives? This course introduces students to the field of sociology. By surveying social theory as well as empirical studies, students acquire what C. Wright Mills calls the "sociological imagination": the ability to think beyond our personal lives and to connect the experiences of individuals with large social structures. The course introduces students to classical theoretical traditions of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Simmel, as well as their contemporary theoretical heirs. Readings include prominent empirical investigations into family dynamics, class inequalities, organizations, the nation-state, capitalism, democracy, and globalization. We examine common-sense assumptions about culture, politics, history, and psychology, and empower students to replace them with evidence-based reasoning. By emphasizing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills, this course helps students build the foundation for a deeper understanding of theory and methods in the social sciences.

Faculty:

Danilo Mandic

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33126/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Boylston Hall Fong Auditorium

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

SOCI S-103 Great Ideas: Thinking Big about Society from Adam Smith to Piketty

CRN 33875 7-week session

Using a practical, hands-on approach, this course introduces students to key ideas and thinkers that have influenced our understanding of how society works in the last two and a half centuries. Along with close analysis of primary texts, an important pedagogic novelty of this course is that, by taking advantage of online visual materials, students watch thinkers and their ideas at work in movies, documentaries, lectures, interviews, and debates. The practical format of this course, which combines textual and visual materials, allows students to understand more easily and from within thinkers' key ideas about modern society. This course also acknowledges the interdisciplinary nature of big thinking about society: capitalism, power, inequality, bureaucracy, revolutions, gender, race, and religion, among other topics. Hence, students are exposed to ideas and thinkers in the following disciplines: sociology, history, anthropology, economics, political science, and philosophy; and in the following subfields: cultural analysis, gender and feminism, race and ethnicity, global studies, post-colonialism, environmental studies, and post-humanism. Selected thinkers include Adam Smith, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, W.E.B. Du Bois, Claude Levi-Strauss, Frantz Fanon, Milton Friedman, Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Pierre Bourdieu, and Thomas Piketty. Specifically, this course aims to help students map the central traditions in the social sciences, analyze and apply key ideas from these traditions, read and use original theoretical and empirical texts, develop skills for watching online visual materials critically, and engage great ideas about society in academic writing.

Faculty:

Alvaro Agustin Santana Acuna

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33875/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 302

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

SOCI S-108 Summer Seminar: Inequality and Social Mobility In America

CRN 33381 7-week session

The United States is currently experiencing high levels of income and wealth inequality and comparatively low levels of social mobility. This seminar asks why this is and what, if anything, should be done about it. We consider both social and individual explanations for inequality and social mobility, and we examine efforts to increase mobility through educational and legal means.

Faculty:

Anya Bassett

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33381/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall 305

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

Students should have a working knowledge of American history and politics.

SOCI S-135 Sociology of Art

CRN 33541 7-week session

This course is canceled.

SOCI S-174 The Sociological Eye: Learning about Society and Culture Through Films

CRN 33343 7-week session

What is the sociological eye? And how can it help you to better understand the world around you? This course introduces you to key themes, methods, and concepts in social and cultural analysis mainly through seminal scholarly readings (Bourdieu, Goffman, Foucault, Weber) and a global selection of classic and contemporary films, documentaries, and TV series (such as The Elephant Man, The Lord of the Rings, Slumdog Millionaire, The Wire, Avatar). The goal of merging scholarly readings with visual materials is to use the latter as an alternative platform to see real-world situations such as inequality, mass incarceration, collective movements, and climate change, among others, through a sociological lens. Thus, visual materials familiarize students with key features of the sociological viewpoint about current social and cultural phenomena and help students to use the sociological eye, that is, to bridge a prompt and strong connection between what the scholarly texts tell us about the phenomena under analysis and the actual observation of these phenomena as they are featured in the selected films, documentaries, and TV series. Students not only read texts about, for instance, what social deviance is, how social ties are established, or the different types of stigma, but they also see how these phenomena occur in the selected visual materials. Yet not all of these visual materials convey a straightforward and apparent sociological message. The goal is to find that message, namely to assess to what extent a given visual material can offer a sociological viewpoint of the real world situation and figure out whether the visual material's sociological message illustrates, complements, or departs from what the readings tell us about the phenomena under analysis; in so doing, students learn critical skills to put in practice the sociological eye. Rather than a final paper, students produce their own short film: their own practical application of the sociological eye.

Faculty:

Alvaro Agustin Santana Acuna

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33343/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 209

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged

SOCI S-192 Globalization and Global Justice

CRN 32788 7-week session

This course provides an opportunity to discuss diverse theories of globalization and global justice via perspectives from sociology, economics, political science, anthropology, geography, history, and the emerging literature from civil society. The course considers research on issues such as democracy, trade, technology, poverty, ecology, culture, diversity, and the search for identity.

Faculty:

Thomas Ponniah

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32788/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Center for Government and International Studies, South Building S050

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

SPAN S-AA Beginning Spanish

CRN 33551 7-week session

This course, conducted mostly in Spanish, is for students with little or no previous knowledge of Spanish. It provides the linguistic, communicative, and cultural foundations to engage in basic daily life interactions in oral and written Spanish. Students gain an overview of the history of the Spanish language and the different ways it blends European and indigenous cultures in art, music, clothing, and family traditions. Through music, visual arts, videos, and short readings of authentic texts, students gain a new perspective of Spanish speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students have the linguistic elements to describe and narrate in the present, future, and past, and engage in different types of basic interactions and conversations about everyday topics. They learn strategies to work through texts, unknown vocabulary, and grammar, and are able to identify informal from formal discourse and learn its importance in Spanish-speaking culture. Moreover, given the prominent place of technology in our lives, students also gain vocabulary for technology and learn what happens to English technical words when adopted or borrowed by the Spanish speaking world.

Faculty:

Maria Jose Martinez Alvarez

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33551/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 210

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

SPAN S-27

CRN 31128 7-week session

An intermediate language and culture class with an emphasis on consolidating and expanding the skills of listening comprehension, oral fluency, and pronunciation in Spanish. It includes a comprehensive review of the grammar and reinforces linguistic acquisition through texts, movies, art, and multimedia projects to acquaint students with cultural issues relevant to the Spanish-speaking world. Written exercises contribute to strengthening language fluency. Oral proficiency is not a prerequisite. Students meet outside of class with some frequency to complete group projects.

Faculty:

Adriana Gutierrez

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-31128/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 107

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

Three years of secondary school Spanish or three semesters of college-level Spanish.

SPCH S-120 Public Speaking

CRN 33912 3-week session I

This course covers public speaking techniques for persuasion, effective interoffice communication, and connecting with an audience. Students learn to utilize their own communication style while adapting their message for a variety of audiences. Students present several speeches and receive peer review. Classes include a focus on use of language, narratives, vocal variation, techniques for persuasion, and effective communication in the workplace. Students become familiar with their own communication style and practice techniques while presenting multiple speeches. Throughout the course students submit working outlines before their speeches, and self assessments after their speeches documenting the successes, weaknesses, and goals for future presentations. Through a tailored group problem-solving exercise, students experiment with various communication techniques. Upon completion of the course students feel confident in their ability to communicate effectively with various audiences.

Faculty:

Jill A. Slye

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33912/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 304

Mondays-Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

SSCI S-100B

CRN 33960 7-week session

This proseminar introduces methods of historical research and writing through debates in history, the social sciences and the history of science. Topics include the study of history in light of contemporary conflicts; history of social science surveys; science and politics in the post World War II period; gender, race, and power in psychiatric practice; anthropological methods; and visual culture in history and politics. Students read primary and secondary source material, participate in class discussion, write short analytic essays, and develop their own research project culminating in a draft of a Master of Liberal Arts thesis proposal.

Faculty:

Louie Dean Valencia-Garcia

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33960/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

SSCI S-100A

CRN 33957 7-week session

This proseminar introduces students to basic behavioral science research methods in anthropology and psychology. It teaches them how to read and evaluate research papers and translate their ideas into viable research projects. Topics include library and archival research, scholarly writing and argument, descriptive research methods, quasi-experimental and experimental design, ethical issues, and analytical methods.

Faculty:

Jack Demick

Course format

Online (live) web conference

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33957/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a grade of B or higher in the alternate expository writing course; an undergraduate statistics course is strongly recommended. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

SSCI S-100B

CRN 33943 7-week session

This proseminar introduces methods of historical research and writing through debates in history, the social sciences and the history of science. Topics include the study of history in light of contemporary conflicts; history of social science surveys; science and politics in the post World War II period; gender, race, and power in psychiatric practice; anthropological methods; and visual culture in history and politics. Students read primary and secondary source material, participate in class discussion, write short analytic essays, and develop their own research project culminating in a draft of a Master of Liberal Arts thesis proposal.

Faculty:

Doug Bond

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33943/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 112

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

SSCI S-100A

CRN 33211 7-week session

This proseminar introduces students to basic behavioral science research methods in anthropology and psychology. It teaches them how to read and evaluate research papers and translate their ideas into viable research projects. Topics include library and archival research, scholarly writing and argument, descriptive research methods, quasi-experimental and experimental design, ethical issues, and analytical methods.

Faculty:

Evan Kleiman

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33211/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 104

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a grade of B or higher in the alternate expository writing course; an undergraduate statistics course is strongly recommended. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

SSCI S-100B

CRN 32496 7-week session

This proseminar introduces methods of historical research and writing through debates in history, the social sciences and the history of science. Topics include the study of history in light of contemporary conflicts; history of social science surveys; science and politics in the post World War II period; gender, race, and power in psychiatric practice; anthropological methods; and visual culture in history and politics. Students read primary and secondary source material, participate in class discussion, write short analytic essays, and develop their own research project culminating in a draft of a Master of Liberal Arts thesis proposal.

Faculty:

Susan M. Lanzoni

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32496/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $

Graduate: $2550

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 111

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

A satisfactory score on the test of critical reading and writing skills or a B or higher grade in the alternate expository writing course.

SSCI S-123 The Culture of Medicine

CRN 33894 3-week session I

When illness strikes us or our loved ones, we must interact with hospitals and healthcare systems and their unique social norms and practices. Similarly, becoming a physician (or other clinician) involves learning biology and medicine, but it also involves immersing oneself into the unique culture of medicine. Hospitals, medical schools, and training programs explicitly, but most often implicitly, inculcate particular ways of thinking, feeling, and acting. Sometimes this culture is healthy, and at other times it hurts patients as well as caregivers. This course is an introduction to the social scientific study of the culture of medicine through the social sciences (particularly sociology, anthropology, and social psychology). The course addresses the ways that social forces construct hospitals into places that have humanizing or dehumanizing cultures for patients and caregivers. The first half of the course introduces some core social, cultural, and social psychological processes that influence how patients and caregivers interact and experience clinical life. The second half of the course analyzes how some vulnerable populations tend to be perceived and treated, and how things could be changed for the better. Students leave with a socially, culturally, and psychologically rich immersion into the life of patients and clinicians, a morally gripping analytic introduction to social theory and social science, and a practical set of issues to orient them as they interact with healthcare systems throughout their lives, whether as patients, caregivers to loved ones, or clinicians themselves.

Faculty:

Omar S. Haque

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33894/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

William James Hall B4

Mondays-Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

SSCI S-172 Storytelling and Global Justice

CRN 33645 7-week session

This class is about the use of storytelling in advancing restorative and transformative justice endeavors and practices. In Greater Boston, a powerful restorative justice movement has been growing at the intersection of justice and healing. Restorative justice practices are holistic, community-focused, and usually involve dialogue (story) among victim, offender, and their families and communities. It is a reparative rather than punitive approach to justice. On the global stage transitional or transformational justice efforts in post-conflict, post-colonial societies have included truth commissions and reparative processes. This course looks at the role of storytelling as a tool for the transformation of individual lives and communities. Students read and write on the topic of restorative justice at the local, criminal justice level or transitional/transformational justice on the global stage, such as in South Africa, Rwanda, and Northern Ireland. Readings begin with memoir in order to experience the role of empathy in telling one's story and listening to others'. From there we work outward to other nonfiction approaches: straight journalism/research, personal journalism, and opinion/advocacy essay. Students' writings come from personal reflection, observation of local and global peace and justice movements (including visits to their local community), as well as assigned reading and research.

Faculty:

Michael P. MacDonald

Course format

Live web conference w/ required on-campus weekend

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33645/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

STAT S-100 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

CRN 32188 7-week session

Statistical principles, applications, and analysis are introduced. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling procedures, estimation methods, confidence intervals, tests of significance, chisquare tests, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance. Computer programming knowledge is not required; R is used and taught in the course.

Faculty:

Michael I. Parzen

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32188/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Science Center Hall D

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

Optional sections to be arranged.

Secondary school mathematics.

STAT S-106 Modeling the World with Calculus, Probability, and Statistics

CRN 33892 7-week session

This course introduces calculus, probability, and statistics as complementary, connected approaches to modeling. We provide concepts and tools for understanding data, variation, randomness, and uncertainty in the world. Both differential and integral calculus are introduced.

Faculty:

Joseph K. Blitzstein

Xiao-Li Meng

Nina Zipser

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33892/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Maxwell-Dworkin G115

Mondays, Wednesdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Optional sections to be arranged.

Precalculus.

STAT S-110 Introduction to Probability

CRN 33796 7-week session

An introduction to probability as a language and set of tools for understanding statistics, science, risk, and randomness. Sample spaces and events, conditional probability, Bayes' theorem, mean and variance, normal, t, binomial, geometric, Poisson, beta, and gamma distributions. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, Markov chains.

Faculty:

Natesh S. Pillai

Course format

On campus with online option

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33796/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

1 Story Street 304

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

Required sections to be arranged.

Calculus (MATH S-1ab or equivalent or above), familiarity with matrices.

SWGS S-1421 When The Princess Saves Herself: Gender and Retold Fairy Tales

CRN 32843 7-week session

Folklore has an enduring appeal in cultures across the world: so enduring that literature and media retell the stories again and again. From mass media such as Disney films to well-known novelists like Margaret Atwood and Terry Pratchett, our authors, filmmakers, and storytellers revisit, revise, and reinvent the stories we all know. When such stories are retold, they are retold to suit our current sensibilities: our children's editions of Grimm's fairy tales no longer include "The Juniper Tree" (otherwise known as "My Mother, She Killed Me, My Father, He Ate Me"); very few villains dance to death in red-hot shoes; and perhaps we even look sideways at royalty as the proper way to run a country. But nowhere is the profound influence of folk process (the way in which we each retell, change, and thus keep folklore a living thing) found more strongly than in how we portray men and women in fairy tales. Is Cinderella's "virtuous suffering" a model we wish our daughters to emulate? Must a young man be a literal prince to succeed in love? Is external beauty a reliable way to judge whether a person is good? This course introduces students to the study of male and female roles in traditional folk and fairy tales, to the study of folk process itself, and then to the particular study of how we have folk processed modern reinterpretations of those gender roles here in the United States. We read a wide variety of folk and fairy tales, and modern adaptations of the fairy tale.

Faculty:

Keridwen N. Luis

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32843/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Lamont Library 240

Tuesdays, Thursdays, noon-3 pm

SWGS S-1455 Freud, Sex, and Gender

CRN 33931 7-week session

This course provides a general introduction to the history and theory of psychoanalysis, with a special focus on questions of gender and sexuality. We explore foundational psychoanalytic concepts through a close reading of Freud's astonishing case studies and his writing on hysteria, dreams, and technique, tracking the development of his revolutionary and controversial theories of gender and sexuality. Freud's primary texts are supplemented by recent cultural and theoretical texts that both challenge and celebrate Freud's work.

Faculty:

Daniel Itzkovitz

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33931/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 212

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

UKRN S-G Ukrainian for Reading Knowledge

CRN 32718 7-week session

This course is designed primarily for graduate students of humanities who wish to acquire a reading knowledge of Ukrainian for research purposes. Texts from a variety of fields are used.

Faculty:

Volodymyr Dibrova

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32718/2017

Credits

8 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $6100

Undergraduate: $6100

Graduate: $6100

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Lamont Library 230

Mondays-Fridays, 9 am-1 pm

Some previous background in Ukrainian, Russian, or other Slavic language.

UKRN S-129 Society, Culture, and Politics in Modern Ukraine

CRN 33174 7-week session

This is the history of modern Ukraine through the study of its society, culture, and politics since the late eighteenth century. Ukraine is studied as a territorial concept encompassing different historical experiences of major communities such as Ukrainians, Poles, Jews, and Russians who have lived for centuries on the territory of present-day Ukraine. Students learn how Ukrainians have become the dominant national project in Ukraine during the last two hundred years. The ongoing crisis in Eastern Ukraine and the Russian-Ukrainian conflict is placed in historical, cultural, and geopolitical contexts.

Faculty:

Serhiy Hennadiyouych Bilenky

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33174/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 107

Mondays, Wednesdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

UKRN S-130 State-Society Relations in Independent Ukraine

CRN 33922 7-week session

This course examines the patterns and dynamic of interaction between the state and society in Ukraine. A state-society approach emphasizes the interdependence of state and social actions, rather than assuming that political developments are predominantly influenced either by state rules or social formations. We analyze the problems of nation-building in post-independence Ukraine, and examine the legacies of the Leninist socialist regime. We look at shifts in state-society relations during and after the Orange Revolution of 2004, the Maidan Revolution of 2013-14, and the on-going war with Russia/separatists. We also study the pursuit of Ukraine's growing civil society to influence state-building and promote human rights and the rule of law in the country. To analyze these developments in Ukraine, we engage major political science perspectives, namely structuralism, constructivism, and rational choice.

Faculty:

Sophia Wilson

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33922/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 106

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

VISU S-34Z Summer Seminar: The Book as Art: Working with Letters, Ink, and Paper

CRN 32585 7-week session

This seminar meets in a vintage letterpress studio on campus. This is a fast-paced crash-course in typesetting and relief printing, using lead type, linoleum blocks, and your own inspiration to complete a set of stepwise exercises that will surprise you with the results of your own creativity. We stress both technical mastery and creative exploration in this course.

Faculty:

Ted Ollier

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32585/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Adams House PRESS

Mondays, Wednesdays, noon-3 pm

VISU S-55 Animation Amalgamation

CRN 33344 7-week session

Faculty:

Lisa Crafts

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33344/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

53 Church Street 202

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-11:30 am

Students should be proficient with Macintosh computers. Knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and/or Premiere Pro is helpful but not necessary.

VISU S-72 American Dreams from <em>Scarface</em> to <em>Easy Rider</em>

CRN 33172 7-week session

This class familiarizes students with popular films produced during crucial junctures in the modern history of the United States, from the Great Depression and World War II through the Cold War, McCarthy era, and the 1960s. More specifically, we study how Hollywood's dream factory responded to dramatic challenges that states of crisis and emergency posed to the founding ideals of American democracy. We look at the wide range of functions that commercial fantasy productions assume, how they at times legitimate and bolster the status quo, but at others also interrogate, expose, and even indict social inequity. Course films provide a representative sampling of classical features from 1932 to 1969, including Scarface, King Kong, The Wizard of Oz, Gone with the Wind, Citizen Kane, Casablanca, Detour, High Noon, The Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Manchurian Candidate, and Easy Rider. The recorded lectures are from the 2015 Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 57.

Faculty:

Eric Rentschler

Course format

Online only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33172/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

VISU S-107 Scrutinizing the American Environment: The Art, Craft, and Serendipity of Acute Observation

CRN 32785 7-week session

A course in the making, perception, and future of the American environment, emphasizing contemporary views in advertising, news media, geography, amateur and professional photography, all as related to ordinary Americans, especially farmers, the military, investors, urban and suburban residents, children, and above all, travelers. Topics range from streets, villages, railroads, shopping malls, and schools to back yards, energy-efficient site design, malls, urban neighborhoods, riverfronts, crossroads, and highways. The course emphasizes the big picture visual understanding of United States built form, the myriad ways individuals see differently and why, the way thoughtful observers find all sorts of secret knowledge, and why looking acutely often produces glimpses of the future of things and cultural shifts.

Faculty:

John R. Stilgoe

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-32785/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Carpenter Center B04

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:15-6:15 pm

VISU S-142 Documentary Aesthetics in Contemporary Art

CRN 33553 7-week session

This course is canceled.

VISU S-160 Visual Trajectories: Forces Shaping Advertising, Landscape, and Popular Visual Imagery

CRN 30352 7-week session

This is a lecture/slide/video course emphasizing the chief forces now shaping American understanding of everyday form, such as the manipulation of aesthetic standards by advertising and Hollywood imagery; the perfection of powered flight and the aerial view; the importance of snapshot photography in relation to home video; the post-1960s fascination with outdoor privacy; contemporary and potential spatial disorientation resulting from computer-aided electronic media; the post-1920 retreat of well-educated people into wilderness; the shaping of gender roles and self-image through clothing design and fashion shifts; and the long-term impact of national advertising campaigns on American notions of quality, uniqueness, proportion, and pleasure as reflected in ordinary visual realms.

Faculty:

John R. Stilgoe

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-30352/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 20, 2017

Class meetings

Carpenter Center B04

Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 pm

VISU S-170 Philosophy and Film

CRN 33911 7-week session

Faculty:

Anne C. Dymek

Course format

On campus only

Syllabus

http://my.summer.harvard.edu/course/sum-33911/2017

Credits

4 credits

Course tuition

Noncredit: $3050

Undergraduate: $3050

Graduate: $3050

Start date

June 19, 2017

Class meetings

Sever Hall 109

Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 pm